Art, Agency And Living Presence: From The Animated Image To The Excessive Object by Caroline van EckArt, Agency And Living Presence: From The Animated Image To The Excessive Object by Caroline van Eck

Art, Agency And Living Presence: From The Animated Image To The Excessive Object

byCaroline van Eck

Hardcover | August 15, 2015

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Throughout history and around the world, people have interacted with works of art as if they were living beings rather than static objects. People talk to artworks, kiss or punch them, even fall in love with them. The phenomenon is widely documented, yet there have been almost no attempts to formulate a theoretical account of this interaction or assemble a history of how it has been understood. This book fills that gap, focusing on sculpture in the period between 1700 and 1900 and drawing on rhetoric and fetish theory to build an explanation of how the vivid physicality of artworks leads viewers to transgress the typical boundaries between objects and themselves.
Caroline van Eck is chair of early modern art and architecture at Leiden University.
Title:Art, Agency And Living Presence: From The Animated Image To The Excessive ObjectFormat:HardcoverDimensions:276 pages, 9.5 × 6.75 × 0.8 inPublished:August 15, 2015Publisher:Leiden University Press AcademicLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9087282311

ISBN - 13:9789087282318

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Table of Contents

Title Page
Acknowledgements
Introduction
                Rhetoric
                Agency
                Experience and Memory
                The Animated Image: A Growing Field
                The Structure of this Book
 
Part One
Enargeia
                Enargeia, Ekphrasis, and Phantasia
                Phantasia, Memory and Living Presence Response
                The Early Modern Afterlife of Ekphrastic Enargeia
                Conclusion
Agency
                Art and Agency
                The Experience of Living Presence
                Living Presence as Agency and Experience
Memory
                Simulacra in the Chambers of Memory
                Perception, Memory and Emotion
                Ekphrasis as Imaginative Recollection and Recreation
                Conclusion
 
Part Two
Idolatry
                Francoise Lemée on the Monument of Louis XIV at the Place des Victoires
                A New Way of Considering Idolatry
                Conclusion
Fetishism
                Persuasive Figuration as the Foundation of Idolatry
Fetishism
‘Les Rapports Intimes des Statues avec la Société’
                ‘Le Ministre le Plus Docile des Volantés de la Religion’
                Conclusion
Aesthetic Ambivalence
                Pygmalion’s Dream
                Petrifying Statue Lovers
                Goethe’s Gallery of Art Lovers
                Kant’s Epistemological Barrier against Fetishism
                Conclusion
Plates
 
Part Three
Framing, Staging and Acting Living Presence
                Living Presence and a Visual History of Art
                ‘Killing Art to Write its History’
                ‘Glorious Visions of the Past’
                ‘The Presence of Reality instead of its Appearance Produced a Fearful Sensation’
                Conclusion
The Afterlife of Art
Aby Warburg on the Lives of Art Works
Representation
Mnemosyne, Nachleben, and Historical Experience
Conclusion
Epilogue—from the Animated Image to the Excessive Object
                ‘The Appearance of the Soul’
                Changing Appreciations of Viewers Attributing Life to Art
                An Anthropological Turn
                Excessive and Transitional Objects
                Homo Animans and Homo Repraesentans

Notes
Bibliography
                Primary Sources
                Secondary Sources
List of Illustrations
                Introduction
                Chapter One
                Chapter Two
                Chapter Four
                Chapter Five
                Chapter Six
                Chapter Seven
                Chapter Eight
                Epilogue
Index
                Copyright Page