Art And Anarchy by Edgar WindArt And Anarchy by Edgar Wind

Art And Anarchy

byEdgar Wind

Paperback

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Will works of the imagination ever regain the power they once had to challenge and mould society and the individual? This was the question posed by Edgar Wind's influential Reith Lectures delivered in 1960 and later expanded into his book Art and Anarchy. The book examines the various forces that have fashioned the modern view of the art, from mechanization and fear of intellect to connoisseurship and--perhaps the fundamental weakness of our age--the dispassionate acceptance of art. In the course of his discussion, Wind surveyed a wide range of topics in the history of painting, literature, music, and the plastic arts from the Renaissance to modern times.
Edgar Wind was born in Berlin, Germany. He was the first professor of art history at Oxford.John Bayley is a Warton Professor of English at Oxford.
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Title:Art And AnarchyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.6 inPublisher:Northwestern University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0810106620

ISBN - 13:9780810106628

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Table of Contents

Preface
List of illustrations
Introduction by John Bayley

1. Art and Anarchy
2. Aesthetic Participation
3. Critique of Connoisseurship
4. The Fear of Knowledge
5. The Mechanization of Art
6. Art and the Will

Notes and references
Index

Editorial Reviews

"The lectures have been amplified by a series of notes that are as long as the text, and these notes display not only an unrivalled erudition, which we would expect from such a distinguished scholar, but many illuminating insights into the philosophy and psychology of art." --Herbert Read