Arthur J. Goldberg: New Deal Liberal by David StebenneArthur J. Goldberg: New Deal Liberal by David Stebenne

Arthur J. Goldberg: New Deal Liberal

byDavid StebenneAs told byDaniel L. Stebenne

Hardcover | May 1, 1992

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This book is the first biography ever written of Arthur J. Goldberg, the former labor lawyer, Secretary of Labor under Kennedy, and Supreme Court justice (which post he resigned at the request of Lyndon Johnson to become U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations), who played a leading role inAmerican political life from World War II until the end of the 1960s. Goldberg, who never wrote memoirs himself, shared his thoughts about his life and work with Stebenne in a series of conversations, which took place occasionally from the fall of 1981 through to Goldberg's death in 1990. He alsoallowed Stebenne access to his papers, including those held under seal in presidential libraries and at the Library of Congress. Based upon these unique sources and written to be accessible to a wide audience, Arthur J. Goldberg is both the story of a leading American liberal and a history ofmodern American liberalism.
David Stebenne is at Ohio State University.
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Title:Arthur J. Goldberg: New Deal LiberalFormat:HardcoverDimensions:576 pages, 9.49 × 6.57 × 1.65 inPublished:May 1, 1992Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195071050

ISBN - 13:9780195071054

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From Our Editors

In a span of four eventful years, from 1961 to 1965, longtime union advocate and liberal stalwart Arthur J. Goldberg won appointments to three of our nation's highest government posts: Secretary of Labor, Supreme Court Justice, and U.S. Representative to the U.N. Here is the first biography of Arthur J. Goldberg, one that investigates this remarkable stretch in Goldberg's public career while offering a stimulating portrait of a man who rose from working-class roots to offices that helped define the shapes of postwar union expansion and liberal policy in the 1960s. Drawing upon a wide range of sources, ranging from sealed government papers to interviews the author conducted with Goldberg in the last nine years of his life, historian David Stebenne writes of Goldberg's youth as the son of a Chicago fruit peddler, his awakening to the pursuit of labor law, and his galvanizing role as legal counsel in the late 1930s newspaper guild strike against the Hearst Company, a triumph which brought him to the attention of the Congress of Industrial Organizations. Appointed gen

Editorial Reviews

"This book chronicles the life of an important figure in the history of labor relations in an impeccably scholarly manner."--The Journal of American History