As Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society, 1850-1930 by Lynne AdeleAs Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society, 1850-1930 by Lynne Adele

As Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society, 1850-1930

byLynne Adele, Bruce Lee WebbForeword byDavid Byrne

Hardcover | November 15, 2015

Pricing and Purchase Info

$62.14 online 
$80.00 list price save 22%
Earn 311 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

“There’s an inspiring and wacky solemnity in these organizations—high values reinforced through pageantry and performance in an ecumenical social setting—which deep down must also have been a whole lot of fun. Now it’s as if that foundational Other America, that underpinning of the America we know, has gradually eroded, and here we remain, living in a world that is a mere shell, a movie set, of the world that made our world manifest, that brought it into being, and all we have left are these perplexing masks, banners, and costumes to puzzle over.”
—David Byrne, from the foreword

Featuring more than two hundred outstanding objects gathered from private and public collections, As Above, So Below provides the first comprehensive survey of the rich vein of art created during the “golden age” of the American fraternal society. By the turn of the twentieth century, an estimated 70,000 local lodges affiliated with hundreds of distinct American fraternal societies claimed a combined five and a half million members. It has been estimated that at least 20 percent of the American adult male population belonged to one or more fraternal orders, including the two largest groups, the Freemasons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The esoteric knowledge, visual symbols, and moral teachings revealed to lodge brothers during secret rituals inspired an abundant and expressive body of objects that form an important facet of American folk art.

Lynne Adele and Bruce Lee Webb introduce the reader to fraternal societies and explore the function and meaning of fraternal objects, including paintings and banners, costumes and ceremonial regalia, ritual objects, and an array of idiosyncratic objects that represent a grassroots response to fraternalism. Setting the art in historical context, the authors examine how fraternal societies contributed to American visual culture during this era of burgeoning fraternal activity. Simultaneously entertaining and respectful of the fraternal tradition, As Above, So Below opens lodge room doors and invites the reader to explore the compelling and often misunderstood works from the golden age of fraternity, once largely forgotten and now coveted by collectors.

Lynne Adele, an independent art historian with an extensive art museum and commercial art gallery background, has specialized in the work of self-taught, folk, and outsider artists for more than twenty-five years. She has written and contributed to numerous exhibition catalogs, books, and journals on American folk art; her exhibition ...
12 Tales of Christmas
12 Tales of Christmas

by Lyn Austin

$3.64

Available for download

Not available in stores

Title:As Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society, 1850-1930Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 10.26 × 10.35 × 1.35 inPublished:November 15, 2015Publisher:University Of Texas PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292759509

ISBN - 13:9780292759503

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of As Above, So Below: Art of the American Fraternal Society, 1850-1930

Reviews

Table of Contents

About As Above, So BelowForeword: Art from the Other America, by David ByrnePrefaces, by Lynne Adele and Bruce Lee WebbAcknowledgmentsIntroduction1. The Rise of American Fraternal Societies in the Nineteenth Century Immigrant Societies African American Societies Religious Societies Fraternal Buildings2. The Growth of an Industry3. Societies with Secrets: An Introduction to Fraternal Orders Freemasonry Odd Fellowship Knights of Pythias Speculative Woodcraft Modern Woodmen of America Woodmen of the World Improved Order of Red Men Order of the Patrons of Husbandry (The Grange)The Objects: A Symbolic Art4. Death Related Imagery / Memento Mori5. Painting6. Banners 7. The Magic Lantern8. Chromolithographs9. Costumes and Regalia Costumes Ceremonial Regalia and Parade Dress Fraternal Aprons10. Three-Dimensional Ritual Objects11. The Lodge Goat: The Lighter Side of Fraternalism12. Vernacular Expressions of Fraternity John Haley Bellamy Tramp Art Trench Art of World War I Textiles13. Monumental Expressions of Fraternalism Mendocino Lodge No. 179, Mendocino, California Ernest Hüpeden’s Painted Forest, Valton, Wisconsin Samuel P. Dinsmoor’s Garden of Eden, Lucas, Kansas14. Brothers at Rest: Fraternal Funerary TraditionsNotesBibliographyThe AuthorsPhotography CreditsIndex

Editorial Reviews

“There’s an inspiring and wacky solemnity in these organizations—high values reinforced through pageantry and performance in an ecumenical social setting—which deep down must also have been a whole lot of fun. Now it’s as if that foundational Other America, that underpinning of the America we know, has gradually eroded, and here we remain, living in a world that is a mere shell, a movie set, of the world that made our world manifest, that brought it into being, and all we have left are these perplexing masks, banners, and costumes to puzzle over.”—David Byrne, from the forewordFeaturing more than two hundred outstanding objects gathered from private and public collections, As Above, So Below provides the first comprehensive survey of the rich vein of art created during the “golden age” of the American fraternal society. By the turn of the twentieth century, an estimated 70,000 local lodges affiliated with hundreds of distinct American fraternal societies claimed a combined five and a half million members. It has been estimated that at least 20 percent of the American adult male population belonged to one or more fraternal orders, including the two largest groups, the Freemasons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The esoteric knowledge, visual symbols, and moral teachings revealed to lodge brothers during secret rituals inspired an abundant and expressive body of objects that form an important facet of American folk art.Lynne Adele and Bruce Lee Webb introduce the reader to fraternal societies and explore the function and meaning of fraternal objects, including paintings and banners, costumes and ceremonial regalia, ritual objects, and an array of idiosyncratic objects that represent a grassroots response to fraternalism. Setting the art in historical context, the authors examine how fraternal societies contributed to American visual culture during this era of burgeoning fraternal activity. Simultaneously entertaining and respectful of the fraternal tradition, As Above, So Below opens lodge room doors and invites the reader to explore the compelling and often misunderstood works from the golden age of fraternity, once largely forgotten and now coveted by collectors."There’s an inspiring and wacky solemnity in these organizations—high values reinforced through pageantry and performance in an ecumenical social setting—which deep down must also have been a whole lot of fun. Now it’s as if that foundational Other America, that underpinning of the America we know, has gradually eroded, and here we remain, living in a world that is a mere shell, a movie set, of the world that made our world manifest, that brought it into being, and all we have left are these perplexing masks, banners, and costumes to puzzle over." - David Byrne, from the foreword