At Days Close: Night In Times Past by A Roger EkirchAt Days Close: Night In Times Past by A Roger Ekirch

At Days Close: Night In Times Past

byA Roger Ekirch

Paperback | October 17, 2006

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Bringing light to the shadows of history through a "rich weave of citation and archival evidence" (Publishers Weekly), scholar A. Roger Ekirch illuminates the aspects of life most often overlooked by other historians—those that unfold at night. In this "triumph of social history" (Mail on Sunday), Ekirch's "enthralling anthropology" (Harper's) exposes the nightlife that spawned a distinct culture and a refuge from daily life.

Fear of crime, of fire, and of the supernatural; the importance of moonlight; the increased incidence of sickness and death at night; evening gatherings to spin wool and stories; masqued balls; inns, taverns, and brothels; the strategies of thieves, assassins, and conspirators; the protective uses of incantations, meditations, and prayers; the nature of our predecessors' sleep and dreams—Ekirch reveals all these and more in his "monumental study" (The Nation) of sociocultural history, "maintaining throughout an infectious sense of wonder" (Booklist).

A. Roger Ekirch is a professor of history at Virginia Tech and the award-winning author of At Day’s Close, Birthright, and American Sanctuary. He lives in Roanoke, Virginia.
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Title:At Days Close: Night In Times PastFormat:PaperbackDimensions:480 pages, 8.2 × 5.5 × 1.1 inPublished:October 17, 2006Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393329011

ISBN - 13:9780393329018

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

An enthralling anthropology of the shadow realms. — John Leonard (Harper's)Absorbing…fascinating…[Ekirch] has plundered an extraordinary range of cross-cultural sources for his material, and he tells us about everything from witches to firefighting, architecture to domestic violence…[A] monumental study. — Terry Eagleton (The Nation)Engrossing…Ekirch's narrative is rooted in the material realities of the past, evoking a bygone world of extreme physicality and pre-industrial survival stratagems. — Publishers Weekly