Authority without Power: Law and the Japanese Paradox by John Owen HaleyAuthority without Power: Law and the Japanese Paradox by John Owen Haley

Authority without Power: Law and the Japanese Paradox

byJohn Owen Haley

Paperback | October 1, 1993

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This book offers a comprehensive interpretive study of the role of law in contemporary Japan. Haley argues that the weakness of legal controls throughout Japanese history has assured the development and strength of informal community controls based on custom and consensus to maintain order--anorder characterized by remarkable stability, with an equally significant degree of autonomy for individuals, communities, and businesses. Haley concludes by showing how Japan's weak legal system has reinforced preexisting patterns of extralegal social control, thus explaining many of the fundamentalparadoxes of political and social life in contemporary Japan.
John Owen Haley is at University of Washington School of Law.
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Title:Authority without Power: Law and the Japanese ParadoxFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9.17 × 5.98 × 0.83 inPublished:October 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195092570

ISBN - 13:9780195092578

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From Our Editors

A comprehensive interpretive study of the role of law in contemporary Japan. Haley argues that the separation of power from authority and concomitant weakness of coercive legal controls have assured the development and strength of informal community controls.

Editorial Reviews

"Haley's work is a sophisticated, clearly argued and important study of the nature of the state and the place and character of authority in Japan that should be of interest to readers in a wide range of social service disciplines."--Pacific Affairs