Autobiography And Black Identity Politics: Racialization in Twentieth-Century America by Kenneth MosternAutobiography And Black Identity Politics: Racialization in Twentieth-Century America by Kenneth Mostern

Autobiography And Black Identity Politics: Racialization in Twentieth-Century America

byKenneth Mostern

Paperback | June 13, 1999

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Why has autobiography been central to African American political speech throughout the twentieth century? Kenneth Mostern illustrates the relationship between narrative and racial categories such as "colored", "Negro", "black" or "African American" in the work of writers such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Malcom X, Martin Luther King, Paul Robeson, Angela Davis and bell hooks. Mostern shows how these autobiographical narratives attempt to construct and transform the political meanings of blackness. This wide-ranging study will interest all those working in African American Studies, cultural studies and literary theory.
Title:Autobiography And Black Identity Politics: Racialization in Twentieth-Century AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:294 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.67 inPublished:June 13, 1999Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521646790

ISBN - 13:9780521646796

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Table of Contents

Part I. Theorizing Race, Autobiography, and Identity Politics: 1. What is identity politics? Race and the autobiographical; 2. African American autobiography and the field of autobiography studies; Part II. The Politics of Negro Self-Representation: 3. Three theories of of the race of of W. E. B. Du Bois; 4. The gender, race and culture of anti-lynching politics in the Jim Crow era; 5. Representing the Negro as proletarian; Part III. The Dialectics of Home: Gender, Nation and Blackness Since the 1960s: 6. Malcolm X and the grammar of redemption; 7. The political identity 'woman' s emergent from the space of black power; 8. Home and profession in black feminism.

From Our Editors

The most powerful black voices in literature this century have been those that tell stories through their own experiences. Kenneth Mostern examines why autobiography plays such and important role in black literature by looking at writers such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Paul Robeson and others. Autobiography And Black Identity Politics explains that as these authors write, they most effectively attack society’s definitions of themselves and their culture through accounts of actual experiences.

Editorial Reviews

"Mostern provides intriguing readings of...the autobiographies he presents." American Literature