Autobiography in Early Modern England by Adam SmythAutobiography in Early Modern England by Adam Smyth

Autobiography in Early Modern England

byAdam Smyth

Hardcover | September 13, 2010

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How did individuals write about their lives before a modern tradition of diaries and autobiographies was established? Adam Smyth examines the kinds of texts that sixteenth or seventeenth-century individuals produced to register their life, in the absence of these later, dominant templates. The book explores how readers responded to, and improvised with, four forms - the almanac, the financial account, the commonplace book and the parish register - to create written records of their lives. Early modern autobiography took place across these varied forms, often through a lengthy process of transmission and revision of written documents. This book brings a dynamic, surprising culture of life-writing to light for the first time, and will be of interest to anyone studying autobiography or early modern literature.

Details & Specs

Title:Autobiography in Early Modern EnglandFormat:HardcoverDimensions:234 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:September 13, 2010Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521761727

ISBN - 13:9780521761727

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Note on references; Introduction; 1. Almanacs and annotators; 2. Financial accounting; 3. Commonplace book lives: 'a very applicative story'; 4. Entries and exits: finding life in parish registers; Conclusion.

Editorial Reviews

'Smyth's arguments are persuasive, blending methods from both history and literary criticism to produce an elegantly written, meticulously research[ed] book. It will be essential reading for historians of early modern England.' History Today