Barefoot In Paris: Easy French Food You Can Make at Home

Hardcover | October 26, 2004

byIna GartenPhotographed byQuentin Bacon

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Hearty boeuf Bourguignon served in deep bowls over a garlic-rubbed slice of baguette toast; decadently rich croque monsieur, eggy and oozing with cheese; gossamer crème brulee, its sweetness offset by a brittle burnt-sugar topping. Whether shared in a cozy French bistro or in your own home, the romance and enduring appeal of French country cooking is irrefutable. Here is the book that helps you bring that spirit, those evocative dishes, into your own home.

What Ina Garten is known for—on her Food Network show and in her three previous bestselling books—is adding a special twist to familiar dishes, while also streamlining the recipes so you spend less time in the kitchen but still emerge with perfection. And that’s exactly what she offers in Barefoot in Paris. Ina’s kir royale includes the unique addition of raspberry liqueur—a refreshing alternative to the traditional crème de cassis. Her vichyssoise is brightened with the addition of zucchini, and her chocolate mousse is deeply flavored with the essence of orange. All of these dishes are true to their Parisian roots, but all offer something special—and are thoroughly delicious, completely accessible, and the perfect fare for friends and family.

Barefoot in Paris is suffused with Ina’s love of the city, of the bustling outdoor markets and alluring little shops, of the bakeries and fromageries and charcuteries—of the wonderful celebration of food that you find on every street corner, in every neighborhood. So take a trip to Paris with the perfect guide—the Barefoot Contessa herself—in her most personal book yet.

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From Our Editors

Ina Garten--author of the bestsellers The Barefoot Contessa Cookbook, Barefoot Contessa Parties!, and Barefoot Contessa Family Style--has traveled widely to talk about her books, and her adoring fans always ask for the same thing: more sophisticated recipes that are simple enough to make every day. Ina has taken their cue and assembled a collection of easy recipes inspired by classic French favori...

From the Publisher

Hearty boeuf Bourguignon served in deep bowls over a garlic-rubbed slice of baguette toast; decadently rich croque monsieur, eggy and oozing with cheese; gossamer crème brulee, its sweetness offset by a brittle burnt-sugar topping. Whether shared in a cozy French bistro or in your own home, the romance and enduring appeal of French country cooking is irrefutable. Here is the book that helps you br...

From the Jacket

Hearty boeuf Bourguignon served in deep bowls over a garlic-rubbed slice of baguette toast; decadently rich croque monsieur, eggy and oozing with cheese; gossamer creme brulee, its sweetness offset by a brittle burnt-sugar topping. Whether shared in a cozy French bistro or in your own home, the romance and enduring appeal of French country cooking is irrefutable. Here is the book that helps you br...

Ina Garten is the author of three previous bestselling cookbooks, including the New York Times bestseller, Barefoot Contessa Family Style. Her highly rated cooking series, Barefoot Contessa, airs on Food Network. She and her husband, Jeffrey, live in East Hampton, NY.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 10.36 × 7.78 × 0.88 inPublished:October 26, 2004Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1400049350

ISBN - 13:9781400049356

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Easy French Cooking at its Best I LOVE cookbooks and this is one of my most favorite because Ina's recipes are easy but the results are so pleasing to both the palate and the eye! A recent dinner party which got "RAVE REVIEWS" from my guests included Ina's Vegetable Tian, the Veal Chops with Roquefort butter, topped off with the Pear Clafouti! The cookbook is well laid out, the photography is exceptional and it makes a superb gift.
Date published: 2006-09-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Paris in my kitchen with Ina! What a great idea! I have all the Barefoot Contessa cookbooks. This is an amazing cookbook! After a few recipes, I felt like I was cooking in Paris! She shares some lovely stories and as always has lovely photos throughout her book. All her books are a beautifully written and stylish. This is a must of anyone who loves to cook and experience Paris in their own kitchen!
Date published: 2006-05-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic and Fun! I own several of Ina Garten's cookbooks but this is by far the best one. I love the simple explanations for some amazing French food. The lemon meringue tart is out of this world!
Date published: 2006-04-07

Extra Content

Read from the Book

to startRaspberry RoyaleKirCassis à l’EauCheese StrawsBlini with Smoked SalmonCheese PuffsRosemary CashewsRadishes with Butter and SaltPotato ChipsRaspberry Royalemakes 4 to 6 drinksKir royale is Champagne with a splash of crème de cassis. I decided to try it with raspberry liqueur and it was even more delicious. When you go to the liquor store, look for the red raspberry liqueur rather than the clear eau-de-vie, which has a totally different flavor.6 teaspoons raspberry liqueur1/2 pint fresh raspberries1 bottle of good Champagne, chilledPour 1 teaspoon of raspberry liqueur into each champagne glass and add 2 or 3 raspberries. When guests arrive, pop the cork and fill each glass with Champagne. Serve immediately.Kirmakes 4 to 6 drinksA kir is an apértif of white wine with a splash of crème de cassis. The cassis adds a hint of fruit and a lovely tinge of pink but it’s not too sweet. I prefer to make them with a crisp, fruity wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc from California or Sancerre fromFrance, but whatever you have on hand is fine.6 teaspoons crème de cassis liqueur1 bottle white wine, chilledPour 1 to 2 teaspoons of crème de cassis into each wine glass and then fill the glass with wine. Serve chilled.Cassis à l’Eaumakes 1 drinkThe French serve cassis mixed with water for a low-alcohol twist on a kir. It’s very refreshing on a hot summer day.6 tablespoons crème de cassis liqueur3/4 cup waterFill a tumbler with ice. Pour in the cassis and water and stir.Cheese Strawsmakes 22 to 24 strawsIn Paris, I was lucky to be invited to dinner at the house once lived in by Louis Vuitton, which is now an amazing museum filled with his old suitcases dating back to the mid-nineteenth century. With cocktails, the hosts served only freshly baked cheese straws piled high, Lincoln Log-style, on a square platter. They’re meant to stimulate your appetite for dinner, not to ruin it. With frozen puff pastry from the grocery store, these cheese straws are really easy to make.2 sheets (1 box) frozen puff pastry (such as Pepperidge Farm), defrosted overnight in the refrigerator1 extra-large egg1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese1 cup finely grated Gruyère cheese1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme leaves1 teaspoon kosher saltFreshly ground black pepperPreheat the oven to 375 degrees.Roll out each sheet of puff pastry on a lightly floured board until it’s 10312 inches. Beat the egg with 1 tablespoon of water and brush the surface of the pastry. Sprinkle each sheet evenly with 1/4 cup of the Parmesan, 1/2 cup of the Gruyère, 1/2 teaspoon of the thyme, 1/2 teaspoon of the salt, and some pepper. With the rolling pin, lightly press the flavorings into the puff pastry. Cut each sheet crosswise with a floured knife or pizza wheel into 11 or 12 strips. Twist each strip and lay on baking sheets lined with parchment paper.Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, until lightly browned and puffed. Turn each straw and bake for another 2 minutes. Don’t overbake or the cheese will burn. Cool and serve at room temperature.You want to work quickly because the puff pastry needs to stay cold until it ’s baked.Cheese PuffsGOUGÈRESmakes about 40 puffsPate à choux dough seems complicated the first time you make it, but it really takes only a little bit of technique and you can use it for so many other things, such as cream puffs, profiteroles (page 219), and éclairs. Many restaurants in Paris bring you a little plate of hot gougères while you ’re waiting for dinner; I love to serve them with cocktails. You can make them in advance, freeze them, and then just heat and serve.1 cup milk1/4 pound (1 stick) unsalted butter1 teaspoon kosher salt1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepperPinch of nutmeg1 cup all-purpose flour4 extra-large eggs1/2 cup grated Gruyère cheese, plus extra for sprinkling1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese1 egg beaten with 1 teaspoon water, for egg washPreheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.In a saucepan, heat the milk, butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg over medium heat, until scalded. Add the flour all at once and beat it vigorously with a wooden spoon until the mixture comes together. Cook, stirring constantly, over low heat for 2 minutes. The flour will begin to coat the bottom of the pan. Dump the hot mixture into the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade. Immediately add the eggs, Gruyère, and Parmesan and pulse until the eggs are incorporated and the dough is smooth and thick.Spoon the mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a large plain round tip. Pipe in mounds 1 1/4 inches wide and 3/4 inch high onto the baking sheets. With a wet finger, lightly press down the swirl at the top of each puff. (You can also use two spoons to scoop out the mixture and shape the puffs with damp fingers.) Brush the top of each puff lightly with egg wash and sprinkle with a pinch of Gruyère. Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden brown outside but still soft inside.To scald milk, heat it to just below the boiling point.Blini with Smoked Salmonmakes 18 to 20 pancakesI wrote this recipe for an article on entertaining in Martha Stewart Living magazine. Blini are little buckwheat pancakes that you can top with smoked salmon, caviar, and/or a dollop of crème fraîche. I make the batter early, but since they’re best served warm, I prefer to cook them after guests arrive. Everyone’s invited into the kitchen for drinks, and while I cook the blini, one of the guests assembles the toppings andserves them.1/3 cup buckwheat flour2/3 cup all-purpose flour1/2 teaspoon baking powder3/4 teaspoon kosher salt3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons milk1 extra-large egg1/4 pound (1 stick) unsalted butter, clarified (see Note)1/2 pound smoked salmon, thinly sliced1/4 cup crème fraîche or sour creamFresh dill, for garnishCombine the two flours, baking powder, and salt in a bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the milk, egg, and 1 tablespoon of the clarified butter, then whisk into the flour mixture. Heat 1 tablespoon of the clarified butter in a medium sauté pan and drop the batter into the hot skillet, 1 tablespoon at a time. Cook over medium-low heat until bubbles form on the top side of the blini, about 2 minutes. Flip and cook for 1 more minute, or until brown. Repeat with the remaining batter. (I clean the hot pan with a dry paper towel between batches.) Set aside.To serve, top the blini with a piece of smoked salmon. Add a dollop of crème fraîche and a sprig of dill.To clarify the butter, melt it in a saucepan over low heat. Remove the white foam that comes to the surface, then allow the butter to sit at room temperature until the milk solids sink to the bottom. Pour off the golden liquid and discard the white sediment.To make ahead, reheat the blini in a 300-degree oven for 5 to 10 minutes before assembling.Rosemary Cashewsserves 8Here is another savory cocktail nibble that would satisfy a French host’s needs. These cashews were inspired by the bar nuts served at Union Square Cafe in New York City, which is one of my favorite restaurants in the world. The cashews are best served warm but you can prepare the rosemary mixture in advance.1 pound roasted unsalted cashews2 tablespoons minced fresh rosemary leaves1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper2 teaspoons light brown sugar1 tablespoon kosher salt1 tablespoon unsalted butter, meltedPreheat the oven to 350 degrees.Spread the cashews out on a sheet pan. Toast in the oven until warm, about 5 minutes.In a large bowl, combine the rosemary, cayenne, sugar, salt, and butter. Thoroughly toss the warm cashews with the spiced butter and serve warm.About French WineIt’s really hard to know about wine. Every time I pick up a book determined to learn something about the subject, I get mired in the details of grapes and tannin and vintages, when all I really want to know is, "What would be good to serve with this rack of lamb?" When we first moved to New York City in 1978, my husband took me to Lutèce, the best French restaurant in the city, for my birthday. I was handed a wine list with pages and pages of options and had not the slightest idea of how to choose. When I finally ordered one of the three bottles that was under a hundred dollars, I had to admit to Jeffrey that I wasn’t even sure if it was a red or a white wine!Recently, I decided to ask an expert to help me sort out at least the basics of French wines. This overview is definitely not for an expert (if you know a lot about wine, don’t e-mail me!). It’s for someone like me who wants to walk into a wine store and ask for something to drink with dinner without feeling like a total idiot. So, here goes.Unlike American wines, which are classified by the predominant grape used, such as Chardonnay or Pinot Noir, French wines are classified by the region in which they’re grown, such as Champagne, Bordeaux, or Burgundy. Of course, what a wine tastes like has an enormous amount to do with the type of grape, the quality of the soil, the weather, and the winemaking process.I have two broad guidelines for thinking about choosing a wine. First, I think about the wine the way I think about a sauce: I want something that will complement the dish rather than compete with it. I wouldn’t put a strong, spicy green peppercorn sauce on a delicate fillet of sole any more than I’d serve it with a big, spicy red wine. Here is where a crisp, fruity white wine such as Sancerre from the Loire would be delicious. The second guideline I use is the French saying "What grows together, goes together." So, when I’m making an earthy Provençal dish such as pissaladière (an onion pizza with olives and anchovies), I might choose a rustic Provençal red wine, such as Bandol, to go with it. There are many French wine regions, but here is an overview of the five that are best known.Everyone’s favorite region is Champagne, whose sparkling wines are named for the châteaux that produce them. We know so many of those elegant names: Veuve Clicquot, Moët et Chandon, Dom Pérignon. As with other wines, whether you end up with a white or red wine relies not on the color of grape but rather on whether the skins are used in the production. Therefore, Champagne can come from a white Chardonnay grape or a red Pinot Noir grape and you still end up with a white sparkling wine. Rosé Champagne is generally made by adding a bit of still red wine before adding the bubbles. Champagne goes with almost anything, from appetizers to dinner to cheese and on through dessert. The Champagne classification brut literally means "dry," and it refers to the sweetness of the wine. The better Champagnes are almost all brut, but the more expensive the Champagne, the more complex the flavor. A very special Champagne such as Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame may be brut but it’s also full of flavor, and, when I pour some for a celebration, I feel that life doesn’t get any better than this.Bordeaux is the next best-known winemaking area and its wines are classified by subregion, such as Pomerol and Saint-Emilion. As with Champagnes, though, they are more likely to be named after the château where they’re produced, such as Château Margaux and Château Mouton-Rothschild, than for the region. Bordeaux are full-bodied. The red wines, predominantly fromCabernet and Merlot grapes, have a rich red color, and the flavor is usually characterized by spicy fruit tones such as black currant, plum, spice, and cassis. When they’re young, they can be astringent, but as they age, they develop round, complex, fruity flavors. The foods associated with the region ("what grows together, goes together")-lamb and duck-are particularly good with Bordeaux wines.Burgundy wines are produced by lots of small estates that combine their grapes to make one wine, and they’re often named for the local region, such as Beaune, Pommard, and Chablis, rather than for a single château. Some bottles are labeled with the name of the region and the name of the importer, such as Louis Jadot and Louis Latour. Red Burgundies, made from the Pinot Noir grape, tend to be lighter in color than Bordeaux but that certainly doesn’t mean they have less flavor. These wines are generally characterized by fragrant red fruit tones such as raspberry, blackberry, cherry, and currant and sometimes also woodsy mushroom flavors. The red wines of Burgundy are delicious with their local beef and rabbit. White Burgundies are made from Chardonnay grapes, but they range from light and dry, such as a Macon, to really big and full of flavor-with tones of honey and nuts-such as Meursault and Chassagne-Montrachet. These white wines are delicious with chicken and seafood, which are popular in Burgundy.Loire Valley white wines are made predominantly from the Sauvignon Blanc grapes and can range from a Pouilly-Fumé, which is oaky and dry, to a Sancerre, a light, crisp, dry white that goes very well with the pork and goat cheese that are found in the region.Finally, Rhône wines come from an area in the south that is sunny and hot, and the wines reflect the region. Both the red and white wines are full and robust and often not very expensive, such as Gigondas. One of my favorite wines, white Châteauneuf-du-Pape, comes from this region. It’s full of buttery flavor without the acidity that’s sometimes associated with a young white wine.But at the end of the day, the only thing that counts is what you like. The old rules of white wine with fish and chicken and red wine with meat have been discarded in favor of drinking anything that tastes good to you. It’s always smart to find a good retailer and build a relationship with him or her. Ask for recommendations to go with the particular dish you’ll be serving; it’s their job to know which wines complement different foods.For me, the best way to learn about wine is to buy several different wines in one category, such as Burgundy, and serve them all together at a party. Everyone has fun tasting the wines, bottles are passed back and forth, we laugh about the descriptions everyone comes up with, and maybe, if we’re lucky, we might even learn something. How bad can that be?You can also brush the pastry with pesto, tapenade, or sun-dried tomato paste instead of sprinkling with the cheeses.To freeze, bake the puffs, allow them to cool, and freeze in a sealed plastic bag. Reheat at 425 degrees for 5 minutes.Radishes with Butter and Saltserves 6 to 8How simple is this? It is derived from a very old-fashioned French snack for children: a radish sandwiched between two slices of buttered bread. With drinks, I often serve plain or herbed butter spread on slices of French bread and a big bowl of radishes with sea salt.2 bunches of radishes with the tops intactSea saltGood salted butter or Herbed Butter (recipe follows)1 French baguette, sliced diagonally, and lightly toastedArrange the radishes on a bed of sea salt. Spread the butter on slices of toasted bread and arrange artfully on a platter. Serve at room temperature.herbed butter1/4 pound unsalted butter, at room temperature1 1/2 teaspoons minced scallions1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh dill1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley1/2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice1/2 teaspoon kosher saltPinch freshly ground black pepperCombine all the ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on low speed until combined. Do not whip.Radishes With Butter & Saltserves 6 to 8How simple is this? It is derived from a very old-fashioned French snack for children: a radish sandwiched between two slices of buttered bread. It’s also delicious with a drink before dinner.2 bunches of radishes with the tops intactSea saltGood salted butter or Herbed Butter (recipe follows)1 French baguette, sliced diagonally, and lightly toastedArrange the radishes on a bed of sea salt. Spread the butter on slices of toasted bread and arrange artfully on a platter. Serve at room temperature.Herbed Butter1/4 pound unsalted butter, at room temperature1 1/2 teaspoons minced scallions1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh dill1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley1/2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice1/2 teaspoon kosher saltPinch freshly ground black pepperCombine all the ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on low speed until combined. Do not whip.Radishes With Butter & Saltserves 6 to 8How simple is this? It is derived from a very old-fashioned French snack for children: a radish sandwiched between two slices of buttered bread. It’s also delicious with a drink before dinner.2 bunches of radishes with the tops intactSea saltGood salted butter or Herbed Butter (recipe follows)1 French baguette, sliced diagonally, and lightly toastedArrange the radishes on a bed of sea salt. Spread the butter on slices of toasted bread and arrange artfully on a platter. Serve at room temperature.Herbed Butter1/4 pound unsalted butter, at room temperature1 1/2 teaspoons minced scallions1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh dill1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh parsley1/2 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice1/2 teaspoon kosher saltPinch freshly ground black pepperCombine all the ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on low speed until combined. Do not whip.Potato Chipsserves 6I spent days frying potatoes in oil to find a chip that didn’t have to be fried just before serving with drinks. Finally, I discovered that if I fried these potatoes early, I could reheat them on a baking sheet and they were even crisper and more flavorful than right out of the hot oil. They’re also good with a steak for dinner!2 pounds Idaho potatoes, peeledPeanut or canola oilSea salt or kosher saltSlice the potatoes 1/16 inch thick with a vegetable slicer or mandoline. Soak the slices in cold water, drain the water, and soak one more time to eliminate some of the starch.Meanwhile, place 2 to 3 inches of peanut oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot and heat it to 375 degrees on a candy thermometer. Drain the potatoes and pat them dry. Toss a handful of potatoes into the hot oil and fry them until they’re golden brown, about 3 minutes, tossing to cook evenly. Be careful of the hot fat! Remove the potatoes with a slotted spoon or wire basket and drain on paper towels. Repeat the frying with the remaining potatoes.Before serving, heat the oven to 350 degrees.Place all the potatoes in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Sprinkle generously with salt and serve.Copyright© 2004 by Ina Garten