Baseball: The Golden Age by Harold Seymour

Baseball: The Golden Age

byHarold Seymour

Paperback | July 1, 1989

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Focusing on the years 1903 to 1930, Dr. Seymour discusses the emergence of the two major leagues and the World Series, the bitter trade struggles and pennant rivalries, and such legendary figures as Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb.

About The Author

About the Author: Harold Seymour, Ph.D., baseball's leading historian, was a college history professor for more than fifteen years. Moreover, he knows baseball firsthand through experience as batboy for the Brooklyn Dodgers, high school PSAL and college player, organizer and field manager of amateur and semipro teams, and major-league...

Details & Specs

Title:Baseball: The Golden AgeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:512 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.68 inPublished:July 1, 1989Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195059131

ISBN - 13:9780195059137

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From Our Editors

With Baseball: The Golden Age, Dr. Harold Seymour--the man whom Sports Illustrated has called 'the Edward gibbon of baseball history'--continues his monumental multi-volume study of the sport. This second volume explores the both glorious and grievous era when the game truly captured the American imagination with such legendary figures at Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth and also appalled fans with startling scandals. Beginning with the formation of the two major leagues in 1903, Seymour examines the changes in the organization of professional baseball from an unwieldy three-man commission to the strong one-man rule of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis.

Editorial Reviews

"With devastating documentation [Seymour] portrays the contrast between the beauty of the game on the field and widespread dishonesty off it."--The New Republic