Battle Grounds: The Canadian Military And Aboriginal Lands by P. Whitney LackenbauerBattle Grounds: The Canadian Military And Aboriginal Lands by P. Whitney Lackenbauer

Battle Grounds: The Canadian Military And Aboriginal Lands

byP. Whitney Lackenbauer

Paperback | July 1, 2007

Pricing and Purchase Info

$30.31 online 
$32.95 list price save 8%
Earn 152 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 1-3 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Base closures, use of airspace for weapons testing and low-level flying, environmental awareness, and Aboriginal land claims have focused attention in recent years on the use of Native lands for military training. But is the military’s interest in Aboriginal lands new? Battle Grounds analyzes a century of government–Aboriginal interaction and negotiation to explore how the Canadian military came to use Aboriginal lands for training. It examines what the process reveals about the larger and evolving relationship between governments and Native communities, and how increasing Aboriginal assertiveness and activism have affected the issue.
P. Whitney Lackenbauer is an assistant professor in the Department of History at St. Jerome’s University
Loading
Title:Battle Grounds: The Canadian Military And Aboriginal LandsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.91 inPublished:July 1, 2007Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774813164

ISBN - 13:9780774813167

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

1 A Road to Nowhere? The Search for Sites in British Columbia, 1907-30

2 Governmental Uncertainty: The Militia and the Sarcee Reserve, 1908-39

3 “Pay No Attention to Sero”: Imperial Flying Training at Tyendinaga, 1917-18

4 The Thin Edge of a Wedge? The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and Aboriginal Lands, 1940-45

5 Combined Operation: Creating Camp Ipperwash, 1942-45

6 The Cold War at Cold Lake: The Primrose Lake Air Weapons Range, 1951-65

7 Into the Driver’s Seat? The Department of National Defence and the Sarcee Band, 1945-82

8 Renegotiating Relationships: Competing Claims in the 1970s and 1980s

9 Closing Out the Century Reflections

Appendices

Notes

Selected Bibliography

Index

Editorial Reviews

Base closures, use of airspace for weapons testing and low-level flying, environmental awareness, and Aboriginal land claims have focused attention in recent years on the use of Native lands for military training. But is the military’s interest in Aboriginal lands new? Battle Grounds analyzes a century of government–Aboriginal interaction and negotiation to explore how the Canadian military came to use Aboriginal lands for training. It examines what the process reveals about the larger and evolving relationship between governments and Aboriginal communities and how increasing Aboriginal assertiveness and activism have affected the issue.Whitney Lackenbauer’s Battle Grounds surveys the complex world of Native-military relations in twentieth-century Canada. Skillfully parsing the diverse forces at work in this relationship, his account is an astute reinterpretation of government-Aboriginal interactions that greatly enriches scholarly writing on relations between Natives and newcomers. - J.R. Miller, author of Lethal Legacy: Current Native Controversies in Canada