Beginning to Spell: A Study of First-Grade Children by Rebecca Treiman

Beginning to Spell: A Study of First-Grade Children

byRebecca Treiman

Hardcover | July 1, 1992

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This groundbreaking study on the psycholinguistics of spelling presents the author's original empirical research on spelling and supplies the theoretical framework necessary to understand how children's ability to write is related to their ability to speak a language. The author exploresareas in a field dominated by work traditionally concerned with the psychodynamics of reading skills and, in so doing, highlights the importance of learning to spell for both psycholinguists and educators, since as they begin to spell, children attempt to represent the phonological, or sound form,of words. The study of children's spelling can shed light on the nature of phonological systems and can illuminate the way sounds are organized into larger units, such as syllables and words. Research on children's spelling leads directly to an understanding of the way phonological knowledge isacquired and how phonological systems change with the development of reading and writing ability. In addition to this insight concerning cognitive processes, the findings presented here have implications for how spelling should be taught and why some writing systems are easier to master thanothers. The work will interest a wide range of cognitive and developmental psychologists, psycholinguists, and educational psychologists, as well as linguists and educators interested in psycholinguistics.

About The Author

Rebecca Treiman is Professor of Psychology at Wayne State University. She received an undergraduate degree in linguistics from Yale University and a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. Her research focuses on spoken language, written language, and the relationship between them.
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Details & Specs

Title:Beginning to Spell: A Study of First-Grade ChildrenFormat:HardcoverDimensions:384 pages, 9.57 × 6.5 × 1.26 inPublished:July 1, 1992Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195062191

ISBN - 13:9780195062199

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. Spelling of Words3. Spelling of Phonemes: Correct Spellings, Legal Substitutions, and Illegal Substitutions4. Vowels5. Consonants6. The Influence of Orthography on Children's Spelling of Vowels and Consonants7. Vowel Omissions8. Consonant Omissions9. Reversals10. Inflected and Derived Words11. Conclusions and Implications

From Our Editors

This groundbreaking study on the psycholinguistics of spelling presents the author's original empirical research with 43 American first graders. The study supplies the theoretical framework necessary to understand how children's ability to write is related to their ability to speak a language. The author explores areas in a field traditionally dominated by work on reading skills and highlights the importance of learning to spell for both psychologists and educators. Since as they begin to spell, children attempt to represent the phonological, or sound form, of words, the study of children's spelling can shed light on the nature of children's sound systems and can illuminate the way sounds are organized into larger units, such as syllables and words. Research on children's spelling leads directly to an understanding of the way phonological knowledge is acquired and how phonological systems change with the development of reading and writing ability. In addition to this insight concerning cognitive processes, the findings presented here have implications for how spel

Editorial Reviews

"Treiman's data are a phonological gold mine, and her analyses of it are systematic and frank. Thoughtful readers will come away with many insights of their own....Newer research indicates that older children do indeed learn to spell by memorization, but only after passing through aphonological stage. Treiman's study proves decisively that such a stage exists, which makes Beginning to Spell an important volume. Anyone interested in phonology, orthography, or child language should read it. Educators may find it enlightening..." American Speech