Beholden: Religion, Global Health, and Human Rights

Hardcover | March 11, 2015

bySusan R. Holman

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Global health efforts today are usually shaped by two very different ideological approaches: a human rights-based approach to health and equity - often associated with public health, medicine, or economic development activities; or a religious or humanitarian "aid" approach motivated bypersonal beliefs about charity, philanthropy, missional dynamics, and humanitarian "mercy." The underlying differences between these two approaches can create tensions and even outright hostility that undermines the best intentions of those involved. In Beholden: Religion, Global Health, and Human Rights, Susan R. Holman - a scholar in both religion and the history of medicine - challenges this traditional polarization by telling stories designed to help shape a new perspective on global health, one that involves a multidisciplinary integrationof religion and culture with human rights and social justice. The book's six chapters range broadly, describing pilgrimage texts in the Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, and Islamic traditions; the effect of ministry and public policy on nineteenth-century health care for the poor; the story of theUniversal Declaration of Human Rights as it shaped economic, social, and cultural rights; a "religious health assets" approach based in Southern Africa; and the complex dynamics of gift exchange in the modern faith-based focus on charity, community, and the common good. Holman's study serves as aninsightful guide for students and practitioners interested in improving and broadening the scope of global health initiatives, with an eye towards having the greatest impact possible.

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Global health efforts today are usually shaped by two very different ideological approaches: a human rights-based approach to health and equity - often associated with public health, medicine, or economic development activities; or a religious or humanitarian "aid" approach motivated bypersonal beliefs about charity, philanthropy, miss...

Susan R. Holman is Senior Writer at the Global Health Education and Learning Incubator at Harvard University. Formerly writer and editor at Harvard School of Public Health, she has also worked in clinical nutrition and holds a PhD in religious studies from Brown. She is the author of The Hungry Are Dying: Beggars and Bishops in Roman ...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:312 pages, 8.31 × 5.79 × 1.1 inPublished:March 11, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199827761

ISBN - 13:9780199827763

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Toward a vision of the ought2. Religious pilgrimage: From 'glocality' to global health3. Private lens, public health: A reluctant physician in 19th century America4. From Matthew 25 to Article 25: Why economic, social, and cultural (ESC) rights matter5. Between Cape Town and Memphis: Religious health assets6. Don't teach me to fish: What's wrong with gift-charity?AcknowledgementsNotesSelect BibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

"Susan Holman weaves theology, history, ethics, and her own fascinating pilgrimage as a public health specialist and scholar of religion to produce a book that is a swirling, sumptuous tapestry. Not only a feast of vivid prose, Beholden is an unmatched account of why the often separate worldsof religion, health, and human rights need each other--urgently--at a time of desperate crises and grave inequities in global public health." --Timothy Samuel Shah, Associate Director of the Religious Freedom Project, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs, Georgetown University