Ben Jonson In The Romantic Age by Tom LockwoodBen Jonson In The Romantic Age by Tom Lockwood

Ben Jonson In The Romantic Age

byTom Lockwood

Hardcover | September 15, 2005

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Tom Lockwood's study is the first examination of Jonson's place in the texts and culture of the Romantic age. Part one of the book explores theatrical, critical, and editorial responses to Jonson, including his place in the post-Garrick theatre, critical estimations of his life and work, andthe politically-charged making and reception of William Gifford's 1816 edition of Jonson's Works. Part two explores allusive and imitative responses to Jonson's poetry and plays in the writings of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and explores how Jonson serves variously as a model by which to measure thepoet laureate, Robert Southey, and Coleridge's eldest son, Hartley. The introduction and conclusion locate this 'Romantic Jonson' against his eighteenth-century and Victorian re-creations. Ben Jonson in the Romantic Age shows us a varied, mobile, and contested Jonson and offers a fresh perspectiveon the Romantic age.
Dr Tom Lockwood is a Tom Lockwood is a Lecturer in English at the University of Birmingham. He was the 2003 winner of the iReview of English Studies/i Essay Prize.
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Title:Ben Jonson In The Romantic AgeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.83 inPublished:September 15, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199280789

ISBN - 13:9780199280780

Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Romantic Jonson, Marginal Jonson2. Francis Godolphin Waldron and The Sad Shepherd/I: Theatre, Criticism, Editing3. Theatrical Jonson4. Critical Jonson5. Editorial Jonson6. Francis Godolphin Waldron and The Sad Shepherd/I: Allusion and Imitation7. Allusive Jonson (I): Coleridge8. Allusive Jonson (II): Coleridge, Southey, and Hartley Coleridge9. Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

"A careful and serious discussion of Jonson's presence between 1776 and 1850."--Elizabeth Helsinger, Studies in English Literature