Beneath Flanders Fields: The Tunnellers' War 1914-18 by Peter BartonBeneath Flanders Fields: The Tunnellers' War 1914-18 by Peter Barton

Beneath Flanders Fields: The Tunnellers' War 1914-18

byPeter Barton, Peter Doyle, Johan Vandewalle

Paperback | January 1, 2014

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The result of over twenty-five years of research, Beneath Flanders Fields reveals how this intense underground battle was fought and won. The authors give the first full account of mine warfare in World War I through the words of the tunnellers themselves as well as plans, drawings, and previously unpublished archive photographs, many in colour. Beneath Flanders Fields also shows how military mining evolved. The tunnellers constructed hundreds of deep dugouts that housed tens of thousands of troops. Often electrically lit and ventilated, these tunnels incorporated headquarters, cookhouses, soup kitchens, hospitals, drying rooms, and workshops. A few dugouts survive today, a final physical legacy of the Great War, and are presented for the first time in photographs in Beneath Flanders Fields.
Peter Barton is a filmmaker, writer, and secretary of the All Parliamentary War Graves and Battlefields Heritage Group. Peter Doyle is a geologist and archaeologist who has studied the battlefields of the Western Front, Gallipoli, and Salonika. He is co-secretary of the All Parliamentary War Graves and Battlefields Heritage Group. Joha...
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Title:Beneath Flanders Fields: The Tunnellers' War 1914-18Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 11 × 8.5 × 0.68 inPublished:January 1, 2014Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773543015

ISBN - 13:9780773543010

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Editorial Reviews

"A fascinating and brilliantly illustrated book, an invaluable guide for future generations of Great War archaeologists." Times Higher Education Supplement