Between Rome And Jerusalem: 300 Years Of Roman-judaean Relations

Hardcover | January 1, 2001

byMartin Sicker

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However, because of the unique character of its religion and culture, which bred an intense nationalism unknown elsewhere in the ancient world, Judaea turned out to be a weak link holding the Roman Empire in the east together. As such, it became a factor of some importance in the protracted struggle of Rome and Parthia for hegemony in southwest Asia. Judaea thus took on a political and strategic significance that was grossly disproportionate to its size and made its subjugation and domination an imperative of Roman foreign policy for two centuries, from Pompeius to Hadrian. In effect, the history of the period may be viewed as the story of the conflict between Roman imperialism and Judaean nationalism. A fresh look at ancient Middle Eastern and Roman history that will be invaluable for students and scholars of ancient history, post-biblical Jewish history and of Christian origins.

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However, because of the unique character of its religion and culture, which bred an intense nationalism unknown elsewhere in the ancient world, Judaea turned out to be a weak link holding the Roman Empire in the east together. As such, it became a factor of some importance in the protracted struggle of Rome and Parthia for hegemony in ...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:216 pages, 9.46 × 6.32 × 0.84 inPublished:January 1, 2001Publisher:Praeger PublishersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275971406

ISBN - 13:9780275971403

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?This book is suitable for use in an undergraduate course in geopolitics or Middle Eastern or Roman History, or for background information for graduate students in these areas. General readers, with an interest in Judaean or Roman History, will also find this book informative.?-Suite101.com