Between Two Empires: Race, History, and Transnationalism in Japanese America

Paperback | March 1, 2005

byEiichiro Azuma

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The incarceration of Japanese Americans has been discredited as a major blemish in American democratic tradition. Accompanying this view is the assumption that the ethnic group help unqualified allegiance to the United States. Between Two Empires probes the complexities of prewar JapaneseAmerica to show how Japanese in America held an in-between space between the United States and the empire of Japan, between American nationality and Japanese racial identity.

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The incarceration of Japanese Americans has been discredited as a major blemish in American democratic tradition. Accompanying this view is the assumption that the ethnic group help unqualified allegiance to the United States. Between Two Empires probes the complexities of prewar JapaneseAmerica to show how Japanese in America held an ...

Eiichiro Azuma is an Assistant Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Kobo ebook|May 25 2006

$57.79 online$74.99list price(save 22%)
Format:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 6.1 × 9.09 × 0.91 inPublished:March 1, 2005Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195159411

ISBN - 13:9780195159417

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"While aspiring to a cosmopolitan vision, building bridges across the Pacific, the Japanese in America could not escape the clutching hands of the state--indeed two states. In response to the difficult situation, Japanese immigrants developed alternative narratives of their experiences, but aparticularly persistent narrative incorporated the American vocabulary of the frontier, reform, family values, and race purity. With this thorough and sophisticated study, so filled with fascinating data and insights, it is not surprising that transnational history is emerging as an imaginativeapproach to the history of the modern world."--Akira Iriye, Harvard University