Bifunctional Compounds

Paperback | March 1, 1994

byRobert S. Ward

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Most important organic molecules contain more than one functional group, and very often the interaction between these groups determines the chemical and biological behaviour of the compounds. This concise text outlines some of the methods used to prepare bifunctional compounds and thensurveys the chemistry of some of the more important classes. Problems - with solutions - and suggestions for further reading are provided, and students who are familiar with the reactions of monofunctional compounds will find this text an invaluable introduction to the more advanced aspects oforganic chemistry.

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Most important organic molecules contain more than one functional group, and very often the interaction between these groups determines the chemical and biological behaviour of the compounds. This concise text outlines some of the methods used to prepare bifunctional compounds and thensurveys the chemistry of some of the more importan...

Robert S. Ward is at University of Wales, Swansea.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.28 inPublished:March 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198558082

ISBN - 13:9780198558088

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Table of Contents

Introduction1. Preparation of bifunctional compounds2. Reactions of dienes3. Reactions of diols4. Reactions of hydroxy- and aminocarbonyl compounds5. Reactions of dicarbonyl compounds6. Reactions of unsaturated carbonyl compounds7. Enamines, enol ethers, and enolates8. Allyl compounds9. Selective protection of bifunctional compounds10. Cyclisation versus polymerisationAnswers to problemsFurther readingIndex