Big Pharma, Women, and the Labour of Love by Thea CacchioniBig Pharma, Women, and the Labour of Love by Thea Cacchioni

Big Pharma, Women, and the Labour of Love

byThea Cacchioni

Paperback | July 29, 2015

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In 2010, Thea Cacchioni testified before the US Food and Drug Administration against flibanserin, a drug proposed to treat low sexual desire in women, dubbed by the media the "pink Viagra." She was one of many academics and activists sounding the alarm about the lack of science behind the search for potentially lucrative female sexual enhancement drugs.

In her book, Big Pharma, Women, and the Labour of Love, Cacchioni moves beyond the search for a sexual pharmaceutical drug for women to ask a broader question: how does the medicalization of female sexuality already affect women's lives? Using in-depth interviews with doctors, patients, therapists, and other medical practitioners, Cacchioni shows that, whatever the future of the "pink Viagra," heterosexual women often now feel expected to take on the job of managing their and their partners' sexual desires. Their search for sexual pleasure can be a "labour of love," work that is enjoyable for some but a chore for others.

An original and insightful take on the burden of heterosexual norms in an era of compulsory sexuality, Cacchioni's investigation should open up a wide-ranging discussion about the true impact of the medicalization of sexuality.

Thea Cacchioni is an assistant professor in the Department of Women's Studies at the University of Victoria.
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Title:Big Pharma, Women, and the Labour of LoveFormat:PaperbackDimensions:184 pages, 8.98 × 6.06 × 0.48 inPublished:July 29, 2015Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1442611375

ISBN - 13:9781442611375

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Table of Contents

Preface: Testifying at the FDA
Introduction: The Labour of Love in the Sexual Pharmaceutical Era
Chapter One: The Rise and Decline of Pharma's 'Sexual Revolution'
Chapter Two: Treating Women's Sexual Pain: Biomedicalized, Demedicalized, and Do-It-Yourself Approaches
Chapter Three: The Limits of Normative (Hetero) Sex
Chapter Four: Sex Work: A Labour of Love
Chapter Five: Refusing Heteronormative Sex Work
Chapter Six: A Woman's Work is Never Done
Epilogue: The Sexual Pharmaceutical Industry and Its Discontents

Appendix 1: Women's Sexual Problems: a New Classification
Appendix 2: Participant Profiles (in Alphabetical Order)
Appendix 3: Biofeedback Readout

Editorial Reviews

In 2010, Thea Cacchioni testified before the US Food and Drug Administration against flibanserin, a drug proposed to treat low sexual desire in women, dubbed by the media the "pink Viagra." She was one of many academics and activists sounding the alarm about the lack of science behind the search for potentially lucrative female sexual enhancement drugs.In her book, Big Pharma, Women, and the Labour of Love, Cacchioni moves beyond the search for a sexual pharmaceutical drug for women to ask a broader question: how does the medicalization of female sexuality already affect women's lives? Using in-depth interviews with doctors, patients, therapists, and other medical practitioners, Cacchioni shows that, whatever the future of the "pink Viagra," heterosexual women often now feel expected to take on the job of managing their and their partners' sexual desires. Their search for sexual pleasure can be a "labour of love," work that is enjoyable for some but a chore for others.An original and insightful take on the burden of heterosexual norms in an era of compulsory sexuality, Cacchioni's investigation should open up a wide-ranging discussion about the true impact of the medicalization of sexuality."Big Pharma, Women, and the Labour of Love is a model of ethical and engaged research on a deeply intimate and sensitive subject." - Jennifer Terry, Department of Women’s Studies, University of California, Irvine