Bio-Applications of Nanoparticles by Warren C.W. ChanBio-Applications of Nanoparticles by Warren C.W. Chan

Bio-Applications of Nanoparticles

EditorWarren C.W. Chan

Paperback | November 25, 2010

Pricing and Purchase Info

$298.48 online 
$336.95 list price save 11%
Earn 1492 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

In this edited book, we highlight the central players in the Bionanotechnology field, which are the nanostructures and biomolecules. The book starts by describing how nanostructures are synthesized and by describing the wide variety of nanostructures available for biological research and applications. Also shown are the techniques used to synthesize a wide variety of biological molecules. Next, there is a focus on the assembly of nanostructures with biological molecules, which could lead to the design of multi-functional nanosystems. In the following chapters, examples of the unique properties of nanostructures are provided along with the current applications of these nanostructures in biology and medicine. Some applications include the use of gold nanoparticles in diagnostic applications, quantum dots and silica nanoparticles for imaging, and liposomes for drug delivery. In the final chapters of the book, the toxicity of nanostructures are described. This book provides broad examples of current developments in Bionanotechnology research and would be an excellent introduction to the field.
Title:Bio-Applications of NanoparticlesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:228 pages, 9.76 × 6.5 × 0 inPublished:November 25, 2010Publisher:Springer New YorkLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:144192633X

ISBN - 13:9781441926333

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

CONTENTSSection I. Nanostructure and Biomolecule SynthesisPREFACE ........................................................................................................... vii1. SYNTHETIC STRATEGIES TO SIZE AND SHAPE CONTROLLEDNANOCRYSTALS AND NANOCRYSTALHETEROSTRUCTURES...................................................................... 1P. Davide Cozzoli and Liberato MannaIntroduction ......................................................................................................................... 1Colloidal Approaches: A Few General Concepts .............................................................. 3Size Control .......................................................................................................................... 3Shape Control ...................................................................................................................... 4Hybrid Nanocrystals ........................................................................................................... 8Core-Shell Nanocrystals .................................................................................................... 10Nanocrystal Hetero-Oligomers ......................................................................................... 12Hybrid Nanocrystals Based on Rod-Like Sections ......................................................... 14Conclusions ........................................................................................................................ 142. CURRENT APPROACHES FOR ENGINEERING PROTEINSWITH DIVERSE BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES ............................ 18Isaac T.S. Li, Elizabeth Pham and Kevin TruongIntroduction ....................................................................................................................... 18Random Mutagenesis ........................................................................................................ 18Site-Directed Mutagenesis ................................................................................................ 20Non-Canonical Amino Acid Substitution ........................................................................ 21DNA Recombination .......................................................................................................... 23Directed Evolution ............................................................................................................. 25Fusion Proteins .................................................................................................................. 27Circular Permutation ........................................................................................................ 27Conclusions and Perspectives ........................................................................................... 29CONTENTSxvi ContentsSection II. Applications of Nanostructures3. PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTUREOF GOLD NANOPARTICLES .......................................................... 34Travis Jennings and Geoffrey StrouseIntroduction to Gold Nanoparticles ................................................................................. 34Synthetic Routes of Materials Synthesis ......................................................................... 35Optical and Electronic Properties .................................................................................... 37Practical Uses of Gold Nanomaterials ............................................................................. 45Conclusions ........................................................................................................................ 464. MULTI-FUNCTIONAL GOLD NANOPARTICLESFOR DRUG DELIVERY .................................................................... 48Gang Han, Partha Ghosh and Vincent M. RotelloIntroduction ....................................................................................................................... 48Gold Nanoparticles as Nucleic Acid Delivery Vehicles ................................................... 49Protein and Peptide Delivery Using Gold Nanoparticles ............................................... 50Controlled Drug Release by Gold Nanoparticle ............................................................. 51Targeted Drug Delivery ..................................................................................................... 54Conclusions ........................................................................................................................ 555. QUANTUM DOTS FOR CANCERMOLECULAR IMAGING ................................................................. 57Xiaohu Gao and Shivang R. DaveIntroduction ....................................................................................................................... 57Quantum Dot Photophysics and Chemistry ................................................................... 58Cancer Diagnostics with Quantum Dots ......................................................................... 63Toxicity and Clinical Potential ......................................................................................... 70Conclusion .......................................................................................................................... 706. CARBON NANOSTRUCTURES AS A NEW HIGH-PERFORMANCEPLATFORM FOR MR MOLECULAR IMAGING......................... 74Keith B. Hartman and Lon J. WilsonIntroduction ....................................................................................................................... 74A Primer in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) .......................................................... 75Fullerene(C60)-Based Contrast Agents ............................................................................. 76Nanotube-Based Contrast Agents .................................................................................... 77Molecular Targeting of Carbon Nanostructures ............................................................ 80Fullerene-Antibody Conjugates ....................................................................................... 81Closing Remarks ................................................................................................................ 82Contents xvii7. MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLE ASSISTED MOLECULARMR IMAGING ..................................................................................... 85Young-wook Jun, Jung-tak Jang and Jinwoo CheonIntroduction ....................................................................................................................... 85Recent Developments in the Synthesis of MagneticNanoparticle Probes .................................................................................................. 88Molecular MR Imaging Utilizing Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Probes ............................. 94Outlook ............................................................................................................................. 1028. PATTERNING METALLIC NANOPARTICLESBY DNA SCAFFOLDS ...................................................................... 107Rahul Chhabra, Jaswinder Sharma, Yan Liu and Hao YanIntroduction ..................................................................................................................... 107DNA: As a Polymer ......................................................................................................... 107Assembling AuNPs Using DNA Template-An Electrostatic Approach .................... 110Self-Assembly of AuNPs on DNA Scaffold Using CovalentAu-DNA Conjugates ................................................................................................ 110One Dimensional AuNP Ensembles Templated by DNA ............................................. 112Two Dimensional Arrays of AuNPs Using DNA as a Scaffold ..................................... 113Conclusions ...................................................................................................................... 1159. LIPOSOMES IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE........................................ 117Reto A. SchwendenerState of the Art of Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems .................................................. 117Evolution of Liposomes in Cancer Therapy.................................................................. 119Outlook and Future Directions ...................................................................................... 12510. FLUORESCENT NANOPARTICLE FOR BACTERIAAND DNA DETECTION................................................................... 129Wenjun Zhao, Lin Wang and Weihong TanIntroduction ..................................................................................................................... 129NP Preparation and Bioconjugation .............................................................................. 130Bioconjugated NPs for Bacteria Detection .................................................................... 131High-Throughput and Quantitative Detection of Bacteria ......................................... 132Detection of Bacteria from Beef Samples ...................................................................... 133Using Bioconjugated NPs to Detect DNA ...................................................................... 133Challenges and Trends .................................................................................................... 134xviii Contents11. DENDRIMER 101 ...................................................................................... 136Lajos P. BaloghBrief History and Definitions ......................................................................................... 136Synthesis of Commercial Dendrimers ........................................................................... 140Structural Diversities of Molecules in Dendrimer Materials ...................................... 141Dendritic Properties ........................................................................................................ 144Low Generation Dendrimer Molecules (LGD) ............................................................. 144High Generation Dendrimer Molecules, (HGD) ........................................................... 146Medium Generation Dendrimer Molecules (MGD) ..................................................... 146Properties of Molecules; Good Solvent Bad Solvent ................................................. 148Protonation of Polyionic Dendrimers Resultsin Nanophase-Separation, as a Function of pH .................................................... 148Physical Properties of Dendrimer Materials ................................................................. 148Conclusions ...................................................................................................................... 152Section III. Toxicity of Nanostructures12. QUANTUM DOTS AND OTHER FLUORESCENTNANOPARTICLES: QUO VADIS IN THE CELL? ...................... 156Dusica Maysinger and Jasmina LovriIntroduction ..................................................................................................................... 156Fluorescent Nanoparticles .............................................................................................. 156Nanoparticles as Potential Hazards ............................................................................... 161Nanoparticles; Prospects ................................................................................................. 16413. TOXICITY STUDIES OF FULLERENES AND DERIVATIVES ........ 168Jelena Kolosnjaj, Henri Szwarc and Fathi MoussaIntroduction ..................................................................................................................... 168Physical Properties .......................................................................................................... 170Toxicity Studies of Pristine C60 ....................................................................................... 170Toxicity Studies of NonCovalently Modified C60 .......................................................... 174Toxicity of Covalently Modified C60 ............................................................................... 176Conclusion ........................................................................................................................ 17714. TOXICITY STUDIES OF CARBON NANOTUBES ............................. 181Jelena Kolosnjaj, Henri Szwarc and Fathi MoussaIntroduction ..................................................................................................................... 181General Properties ........................................................................................................... 181In Vitro Toxicity Studies on Pristine CNT .................................................................... 184In Vivo Toxicity Studies .................................................................................................. 196Conclusion ........................................................................................................................ 200Index ................................................................................................................................ 205