Biocoordination Chemistry by David E. Fenton

Biocoordination Chemistry

byDavid E. Fenton

Paperback | October 1, 1995

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The role of the transition metals in biological systems is of great interest to chemists: the chemical properties of these metals often define the biological function of the proteins and systems these metals are found in. In this introductory text students are introduced to a number oftopics: the transport and storage of metals: their functions is dioxygen interactions, electron transfer, and enzyme activity; the therapeutic uses of coordination compounds: and the role that small-molecule models can play in advancing our knowledge of the structure and function of transitionmetals contained in metallobiosites.

About The Author

David E. Fenton is at University of Sheffield.

Details & Specs

Title:Biocoordination ChemistryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.28 inPublished:October 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198557736

ISBN - 13:9780198557739

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Table of Contents

1 'Life is inorganic too'. 2 Metal management. 3 Dioxygen management - storage and transport. 4 Electron transfer. 5 Dioxygen management - involvement in enzymes. 6 More metalloenzymes. 7 Therapeutic uses of cordination compounds. Further readingIndex

From Our Editors

The role of transition metals in biological systems is an area of great interest to chemists: the chemical properties of these metals often define the biological function of the proteins and systems these metals are found in. In this introductory text students are introduced to a number of topics: the transport and storage of metals; their functions in dioxygen interactions, electron transfer, and enzyme activity; the therapeutic uses of coordination compounds; and the role that small molecule models can play in advancing our knowledge of the structure and function of transition metals contained in metallobiosites.