Blackstones Guide to the Criminal Justice Act 2003

Paperback | October 22, 2004

byRichard Taylor, Martin Wasik, Roger Leng

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This book analyses, explains, and evaluates the Government's flagship criminal justice legislation, the Criminal Justice Act 2003. It provides an accessible commentary on the wide ranging and complex changes introduced by the Act, which will leave few areas of the criminal justice systemuntouched. The Act starts with changes to police powers, bail, cautioning, and pre-trial disclosure, and moves on to the abolition of committal proceedings and the introduction of the possibility of trials on indictment without juries. It then goes on to provide for prosecution appeals and a broadrange of offences where a trial following acquittal can exceptionally be allowed. The rules on evidence are significantly reformed providing firstly, a much wider basis on which evidence of bad character (including previous convictions) can be admitted, and secondly, for the admissibility of hearsay'where it is not contrary to the interests of justice' to admit it. The Act also provides a major restatement and reform of the sentencing framework and the provisions for release on licence, and abolishes most of the categories of exemption from the duty to perform jury service.Anyone working in the Criminal Justice System or interested in its operation will welcome this guide, which provides invaluable insights into the purposes of the Act and a detailed explanation of its provisions. The book also includes the full text of the Act.

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This book analyses, explains, and evaluates the Government's flagship criminal justice legislation, the Criminal Justice Act 2003. It provides an accessible commentary on the wide ranging and complex changes introduced by the Act, which will leave few areas of the criminal justice systemuntouched. The Act starts with changes to police ...

Richard Taylor is Professor of English Law and Head of School at Lancashire Law School, University of Central Lancashire. Martin Wasik is Professor of Criminal Justice at Keele University, and Chairman of the Sentencing Advisory Panel. Roger Leng is Reader in Law at Warwick University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:720 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.46 inPublished:October 22, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199267251

ISBN - 13:9780199267255

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Table of Contents

1. Police powers2. Bail, cautions, and charging3. Disclosure pre-trial4. Juries, and trials on indictment without juries5. Allocation and transfer of either way cases and live links6. Prosecution appeals against judges' rulings7. Double jeopardy8. Evidence of bad character9. Hearsay10. General sentencing provisions11. Sentencing guidelines and standards12. Non-custodial orders13. Custodial sentences of less than 12 months14. Dangerous offenders15. Release on licenceAppendixText of the Criminal Justice Act 2003

Editorial Reviews

`The author's wry comment on the size and breadth of the Act's changes will not be lost on those who have undertaken the recent Judicial Studies Board training. This book will be a very useful addition to a bench library to complement that training material...The authors reserve their sympathyfor those of us who have to implement the changes in court on a daily basis. That task will be easier if this book is available in your bench library, as I am sure that it will be referred to regularly for an answer to a specific point and a deeper understanding of the Act as a whole.'Andrew Vickers (M C and former Justices' Clerk and Training Officer), Magistrate Volume 61, Number 7