Bodies And Selves In Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in Spenser, Shakespeare, Herbert, and Milton by Michael C. SchoenfeldtBodies And Selves In Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in Spenser, Shakespeare, Herbert, and Milton by Michael C. Schoenfeldt

Bodies And Selves In Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in Spenser, Shakespeare…

byMichael C. Schoenfeldt

Paperback | January 28, 2000

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Michael Schoenfeldt's fascinating study explores the close relationship between selves and bodies, psychological inwardness and corporeal processes, as they are represented in English Renaissance literature. After Galen, the predominant medical paradigm of the period envisaged a self governed by humors, literally embodying inner emotion by locating and explaining human passion within a taxonomy of internal organs and fluids. It thus gave a profoundly material emphasis to behavioral phenomena, giving the poets of the period a vital and compelling vocabulary for describing the ways in which selves inhabit and experience bodies.

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Title:Bodies And Selves In Early Modern England: Physiology and Inwardness in Spenser, Shakespeare…Format:PaperbackDimensions:220 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:January 28, 2000Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521669022

ISBN - 13:9780521669023

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Preface; 1. Bodies of rule: embodiment and interiority in early modern England; 2. Fortifying inwardness: Spenser's castle of moral health; 3. The matter of inwardness: Shakespeare's Sonnets; 4. Devotion and digestion: George Herbert's consuming subject; 5. Temperance and temptation: the alimental vision in Paradise Lost; Afterword; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"But food and appetite may, indeed, have been as important as sex, if not more so, and Schoenfeldt's Bodies and Selves takes a critical step in defining the scope and significance of that consuming obsession." Modern Philology