Body Panic: Gender, Health, and the Selling of Fitness by Shari DworkinBody Panic: Gender, Health, and the Selling of Fitness by Shari Dworkin

Body Panic: Gender, Health, and the Selling of Fitness

byShari Dworkin

Paperback | February 1, 2009

Pricing and Purchase Info

$34.61 online 
$38.95 list price save 11%
Earn 173 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Are you ripped? Do you need to work on your abs? Do you know your ideal body weight? Your body fat index? Increasingly, Americans are being sold on a fitness ideal — not just thin but toned, not just muscular but cut — that is harder and harder to reach. In Body Panic, Shari L. Dworkin and Faye Linda Wachs ask why. How did these particular body types come to be "fit"? And how is it that having an unfit, or "bad," body gets conflated with being an unfit, or "bad," citizen?

Dworkin and Wachs head to the newsstand for this study, examining ten years worth of men's and women's health and fitness magazines to determine the ways in which bodies are "made" in today's culture. They dissect the images, the workouts, and the ideology being sold, as well as the contemporary links among health, morality, citizenship, and identity that can be read on these pages. While women and body image are often studied together, Body Panic considers both women's and men's bodies side-by-side and over time in order to offer a more in-depth understanding of this pervasive cultural trend.

Title:Body Panic: Gender, Health, and the Selling of FitnessFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:February 1, 2009Publisher:NYU PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0814719686

ISBN - 13:9780814719688

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Body Panic is an excellent media analysis for those interested in gender, cultural, or media studies. . .a book detailing the complex interplay of media message about health in relation to gender, race, class, and sexuality is a welcome addition to the ongoing dialogue on health and fitness.”
-Sex Roles

,