Books Behind Bars: The Role Of Books, Reading, And Libraries In British Prison Reform, 1701-1911 by Janet Fyfe

Books Behind Bars: The Role Of Books, Reading, And Libraries In British Prison Reform, 1701-1911

byJanet Fyfe

Hardcover | July 1, 1992

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This is an original and scholarly study of the role of books and libraries in British prisons during the period of penal reforms between 1700 and 1911. Janet Fyfe discusses the role of groups and individuals who advanced the ideology of reform as well as those who were actively engaged in bringing reading material into the jails and prisons of Great Britain. Perhaps Fyfe's most valuable contribution to the field is her rich bibliography of primary sources; these include a wealth of official reports, government publications, books and pamphlets spanning the two centuries covered in her investigation of prison libraries. She examines the extent that different penal institutions and systems--including not only local jails and national prisons but also convict settlements and the hulks--came to adopt the use of books and libraries and their rationales for doing so. The author documents in detail how prison library services were organized, how they were administered and funded, how books were selected, and what consideration was given to the preference of inmates.

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Title:Books Behind Bars: The Role Of Books, Reading, And Libraries In British Prison Reform, 1701-1911Format:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:July 1, 1992Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313284199

ISBN - 13:9780313284199

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?This book contains vast amounts of information exceptionally well organized and compact. The author is masterful in her ability to make meaningful connections among the myria facts and themes unearthed by her research. He flowing narrative style syncopated with prisoners' sometimes salty anecdotes -- make this book entertaining to read and easy to follow. Those interested in penal institution, literacy, correctional libraries and librarianship in a large social context will find this work invaluable.?-Journal of Information Communication and Library Science