Bound To Sin: Abuse, Holocaust and the Christian Doctrine of Sin by Alistair McFadyenBound To Sin: Abuse, Holocaust and the Christian Doctrine of Sin by Alistair McFadyen

Bound To Sin: Abuse, Holocaust and the Christian Doctrine of Sin

byAlistair McFadyen

Paperback | August 15, 2000

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This book discusses the Christian doctrine of sin in relation to sexual abuse of children and the Holocaust, allowing these pathological situations to illuminate and question our understanding of sin. Taking seriously the explanatory power of secular discourses for analyzing and regulating therapeutic action in relation to such situations, the book asks whether the theological language of sin can offer further illumination by speaking of God and the world together. The book is unusual in discussing the Holocaust in relation to Christian doctrine.
Title:Bound To Sin: Abuse, Holocaust and the Christian Doctrine of SinFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.63 inPublished:August 15, 2000Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521438683

ISBN - 13:9780521438681

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Part I. Drawing into Conversation: 1. The loss of God: pragmatic atheism and the language of sin; 2. Speaking morally? The case of original sin; 3. Testing, testing: theology in concrete conversation; Part II. Concrete Pathologies: 4. Bound by silence: sexual abuse of children; 5. What was the problem? 'The Final Solution' and the binding of reason; Part III. Testing the Inheritance: 6. Willing; 7. Power and participation: feminist theologies of sin; 8. Augustine's will; 9. A question of standards: trinity, joy, worship and idolatry; 10. Concrete idolatries; Index of names; Index of subjects.

Editorial Reviews

"This book offers an excellent analysis of Augustine's doctrine of the will. It also provides a surprisingly fresh and appreciative overview of feminist literature as it relates to the topic of sin." Thomas E. Breidenthal, Anglican Theological Review