BOY WHO WENT TO WAR by Giles MiltonBOY WHO WENT TO WAR by Giles Milton

BOY WHO WENT TO WAR

byGiles Milton

Hardcover | August 15, 2014

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A powerful and true story of warfare and human survival that exposes a side of World War II that is unknown by many-- this is the story of Wolfram Aïchele, a boy whose childhood was stolen by a war in which he had no choice but to fight.

Giles Milton has been a writer and historian for many years, writing about people and places that history has forgotten. But it took his young daughter's depiction of a swastika on an imaginary family shield - the swastika representing Germany - for Giles to uncover the incredible, dark story of his own family and his father-in-law's life under Hitler's regime.

As German citizens during World War II, Wolfram and his Bohemian, artist parents survived one of the most brutal eras of history. Wolfram, who was only nine years old when Hitler came to power, lived through the rise and fall of the Third Reich, from the earliest street marches to the final defeat of the Nazi regime. Conscripted into Hitler's army, he witnessed the brutality of war - first on the Russian front and then on the Normandy beaches.

Seen through German eyes and written with remarkable sensitivity, The Boy Who Went to War is a powerful story of warfare and human survival and a reminder to us all that civilians on both sides suffered the consequences of Hitler's war.

GILES MILTON is a writer and journalist. He has contributed articles to most of the British national newspapers as well as many foreign publications. He is the author of five previous works of non-fiction and one novel. His books have been translated into sixteen languages worldwide.
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Title:BOY WHO WENT TO WARFormat:HardcoverPublished:August 15, 2014Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0312590792

ISBN - 13:9780312590796

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Editorial Reviews

Idiosyncratic and utterly fascinating