Branches Without Roots: Genesis of the Black Working Class in the American South, 1862-1882 by Gerald David Jaynes

Branches Without Roots: Genesis of the Black Working Class in the American South, 1862-1882

byGerald David Jaynes

Paperback | April 30, 1999

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The first comprehensive history of the transition from slavery to sharecropping, this major study draws on thousands of previously untapped sources and statistics to reconstruct the socioeconomic history of the antebellum plantation and the birth of the free black worker. Jaynes thoroughlyreexamines the symbiotic nature of the sharecropping system for both planters and workers--how it offered planters a stable work force and offered workers relative freedom, a unified family, and payment for their labor--and analyzes the social and economic effects of sharecropping on the largersocial structure. At the same time, he argues that the collective organization and self-help activities of the freedpeople, the democratic fever incited by black leaders and local agents of the Freedmen's Bureau, and the failure of federal policy were also key factors in the reorganization of thesouthern plantation and the entry of blacks into the post war economy.

About The Author

Gerald David Jaynes is at Yale University.

Details & Specs

Title:Branches Without Roots: Genesis of the Black Working Class in the American South, 1862-1882Format:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 7.99 × 5.31 × 0.79 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195055756

ISBN - 13:9780195055757

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"A most impressive piece of scholarship. It is really a major step forward in an important debate and will have a big impact on subsequent scholars."--Stanley L. Engerman, University of Rochester