Britain and the Last Tsar: British Policy and Russia, 1894-1917

Hardcover | February 1, 1972

byKeith Neilson

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Britain and the Last Tsar is a fundamental re-interpretation of British foreign and defence policy before the First World War. The current orthodoxy asserts that the rise of an aggressive and powerful Germany forced Britain - a declining power - to abandon her traditional policy of avoidingalliances and to enter into alliance with Japan (1902), France (1904), and Russia (1907) in order to contain the German menace. In a controversial rejection of this theory, Keith Neilson argues that Britain was the pre-eminent world power in 1914 and that Russia, not Germany, was the principallong-term threat to Britain's global position. This original and important study shows that only by examining Anglo-Russian relations and eliminating an undue emphasis on Anglo-German affairs can an accurate picture of Britain's foreign and defence policy before 1914 be gained.

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Britain and the Last Tsar is a fundamental re-interpretation of British foreign and defence policy before the First World War. The current orthodoxy asserts that the rise of an aggressive and powerful Germany forced Britain - a declining power - to abandon her traditional policy of avoidingalliances and to enter into alliance with Jap...

Keith Neilson is Head of the Department of History at The Royal Military College in Ontario, Canada.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:424 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.14 inPublished:February 1, 1972Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198204701

ISBN - 13:9780198204701

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`A book of this nature inevitably requires the concentration of the reader, but it is written with as much clarity as the subject matter allows and Keith Neilson rarely stumbles in either fact or interpretation.'Victor Rothwell, University of Edinburgh, The Historical Association