British Aestheticism and Ancient Greece: Hellenism, Reception, Gods in Exile

Hardcover | June 15, 2009

byStefano-Maria Evangelista

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This book is the first comprehensive study of the reception of classical Greece among English aesthetic writers of the nineteenth century. By exploring this history of reception, the book aims to give readers a new and fuller understanding of literary aestheticism, its intellectual contexts, and its challenges to mainstream Victorian culture.

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This book is the first comprehensive study of the reception of classical Greece among English aesthetic writers of the nineteenth century. By exploring this history of reception, the book aims to give readers a new and fuller understanding of literary aestheticism, its intellectual contexts, and its challenges to mainstream Victorian c...

STEFANO EVANGELISTA is Fellow and Tutor in English at Trinity College, Oxford, UK. He has published on aestheticism and nineteenth-century literature, particularly on Walter Pater. His research interests include the classical tradition, gender, and comparative literature.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 8.63 × 5.62 × 0.76 inPublished:June 15, 2009Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230547117

ISBN - 13:9780230547117

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Table of Contents

Contents
Introduction: The Origins
Pater, Winckelmann, and the Aesthetic Life
Vernon Lee and the Aesthetics of Doubt
'Two dear Greek Women': The Aesthetic Ecstasy of Michael Field
The Greek Life of Oscar Wilde
Afterword: A Dream, Three Trials, Two Ghosts
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

"Stefano Evangelista's first book is an elegant, intelligent, short, but significant contribution to the growing bibliography not just on the aestheticism of the final decades of the nineteenth century but also on the Victorian engagement with antiquity." —Simon Goldhill, Cambridge University