British Fiction and the Production of Social Order, 1740-1830: BRITISH FICTION & THE PROD OF by Miranda J. BurgessBritish Fiction and the Production of Social Order, 1740-1830: BRITISH FICTION & THE PROD OF by Miranda J. Burgess

British Fiction and the Production of Social Order, 1740-1830: BRITISH FICTION & THE PROD OF

byMiranda J. BurgessEditorMarilyn Butler, James Chandler

Paperback | November 24, 2005

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In British Fiction and the Production of Social Order, Miranda Burgess examines what Romantic-period writers called "romance." Reading a broad range of fictional and nonfictional works published between 1740 and 1830, Burgess places authors such as Richardson, Scott, Austen and Wollstonecraft in a new economic, social, and cultural context. She argues that the romance held a key role in remaking the national order of a Britain dependent on ideologies of human nature for justification of its social, economic, and political systems.
Title:British Fiction and the Production of Social Order, 1740-1830: BRITISH FICTION & THE PROD OFFormat:PaperbackDimensions:324 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:November 24, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521023335

ISBN - 13:9780521023337

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Table of Contents

List of figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction: romantic economies; 1. Marketing agreement: Richardson's romance of consensus; 2. 'Summoned into the machine': Burney's genres, Sheridan's sentiment, and conservative critique; 3. Wollstonecraft and the revolution of economic history; 4. Romance at home: Austen, Radcliffe, and the circulation of Britishness; 5. Scott, Hazlitt and the ends of legitimacy; Epilogue: Sensibility, genre and the cultural marketplace; Notes.

Editorial Reviews

"[It] does provide a substantive and valuable expansion to our understanding of the ways in which romance variously intersected with shifting contemporary political discourses." Nineteenth-Century Literature