British Romanticism And The Catholic Question: Religion, History and National Identity, 1778-1829 by M. TomkoBritish Romanticism And The Catholic Question: Religion, History and National Identity, 1778-1829 by M. Tomko

British Romanticism And The Catholic Question: Religion, History and National Identity, 1778-1829

byM. Tomko

Hardcover | November 17, 2010

Pricing and Purchase Info

$136.50

Earn 683 plum® points
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

The debate over extending full civil rights to British and Irish Catholics not only preoccupied British politics but also informed the romantic period's most prominent literary works. This book offers the first comprehensive, interdisciplinary study of Catholic Emancipation, one of the romantic period's most contentious issues.
MICHAEL TOMKO Assistant Professor of Literature in the department of Humanities at Villanova University, USA. He holds degrees in English literature from Swarthmore College, Oxford University, and the University of Notre Dame. His writing on the intersection of politics, religion, and romantic literature has appeared in Eighteenth Cen...
Loading
Title:British Romanticism And The Catholic Question: Religion, History and National Identity, 1778-1829Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0 inPublished:November 17, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230279511

ISBN - 13:9780230279513

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction: The Spirits of the Age
The Purgatorial Politics of the Catholic Question
History, Sympathy, and Sectarianism in Elizabeth Inchbald's A Simple Story
Wordsworth and Superstition
Shelley's Conflicted Campaign for Catholic Emancipation
Scott's Ivanhoe and the Saxon Question
Conclusion: 'The Anxious Hour'— England in 1829
Works Cited
Notes
Index

Editorial Reviews

"The meticulous research and probing readings in Michael Tomko's book show how unsettling the issue of Catholic Emancipation was for the major writers of the Romantic periods. It is a stunning contribution to our larger sense of the complexity surrounding issues of toleration and secularization; still more, it makes the most convincing case yet for Catholicism's centrality in Romantic politics and literary production." -- Professor Mark Canuel, University of Illinois at Chicago