Building Character In The American Boy: The Boy Scouts, YMCA, and Their Forerunners, 1870-1920 by David Macleod

Building Character In The American Boy: The Boy Scouts, YMCA, and Their Forerunners, 1870-1920

byDavid Macleod

Paperback | November 28, 2004

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Among established American institutions, few have been more successful or paradoxical than the Boy Scouts of America. David Macleod traces the social history of America in this scholarly account of the origins of the Boy Scouts and other character-building agencies, through which adults tried to restructure middle-class boyhood.

Back in print; First paperback edition.

About The Author

David I. Macleod, professor of history at Central Michigan University, was involved with the Boy Scouts from ages eight through twenty. He is author of The Age of the Child: Children in American 1890–1920.
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Title:Building Character In The American Boy: The Boy Scouts, YMCA, and Their Forerunners, 1870-1920Format:PaperbackDimensions:424 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.4 inPublished:November 28, 2004Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299094049

ISBN - 13:9780299094041

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“Far more than a narrow description of boys' work agencies from 1870-1920, this book illuminates, with rich, carefully hewn detail, important features of the social, structural, and cultural landscape of that era.  .  .  .  Scholars with an interest in character and social structure will find much of value in this book.”—John F. Stolte, Sociology and Social Research