Building Musical Culture In Nineteenth-century Amsterdam: The Concertgebouw by Darryl CressmanBuilding Musical Culture In Nineteenth-century Amsterdam: The Concertgebouw by Darryl Cressman

Building Musical Culture In Nineteenth-century Amsterdam: The Concertgebouw

byDarryl Cressman

Hardcover | March 14, 2016

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When people attend classical music concerts today, they sit and listen in silence, offering no audible reactions to what they’re hearing. We think of that as normal—but, as Darryl Cressman shows in this book, it’s the product of a long history of interrelationships between music, social norms, and technology. Using the example of Amsterdam’s Royal Concertgebouw in the nineteenth century, Cressman shows how its design was in part intended to help discipline and educate concert audiences to listen attentively—and analysis of its creation and use offers rich insights into sound studies, media history, science and technology studies, classical music, and much more.
Darryl Cressman is a lecturer in the philosophy of technology at Maastricht University.
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Title:Building Musical Culture In Nineteenth-century Amsterdam: The ConcertgebouwFormat:HardcoverDimensions:176 pages, 9.2 × 6.1 × 0.7 inPublished:March 14, 2016Publisher:Amsterdam University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9089649484

ISBN - 13:9789089649485

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Table of Contents

List of IllustrationsAcknowledgementsChapter One: The Concert Hall as a Medium of Musical Culture Chapter Two: Listening, Attentive Listening, and Musical MeaningChapter Three: Patronage, Class, and Buildings for Music: Aristocratic Opera Houses and Bourgeois Concert Halls Chapter Four: Acoustic Architecture Before Science: Designing the Sound of the ConcertgebouwChapter Five: Frisia Non Cantat: The Unmusicality of the Dutch Chapter Six: Listening to Media HistoryReferencesIndex