Bush Wanderings Of A Naturalist; Or, Notes On The Field Sports And Fauna Of Australia Felix

Paperback | February 8, 2012

byHorace William Wheelwright

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1861 Excerpt: ... I generally found in low scrub, on the edges of the tea-tree. We come now to the finches, and the members of this class are small in proportion to the soft-billed and honeyeating birds. We had three varieties of the wax-billed finch, or blood-bird, as they are wrongly called in the bush, on account of their blood-red rumps, the real blood-bird being of a bright-red colour, and not met with in this district. The Little Wax-Bill, which was the smallest and commonest of all, being no larger than the liskin at home, of a deep-brown colour, a pointed black tail, a thick beak, red cere round the eye, a bright-scarlet rump, and a red mark over each eye. This was a gregarious bird, and generally met with feeding in flocks, on the ground, among the honeysuckles. The Guinea-Hen Much was larger than the last, but hardly so large as the linnet at home: of a dark-gray colour, striped and marked with black, a bright-red rump, a short dark tail, the feathers barred, like that of the British wren. This bird was usually seen in pairs, among the small sheyoaks and tea-tree scrub. These two species remained with us throughput the year. But by far the most elegant, and in our district the rarest of all, was the Spotted-sided Mnch, a summer migrant to our parts, very similar in shape and size to the last, but of a pure white colour, with gray-and-black markings, six or eight deepblack spots on each side, a bright scarlet rump, and palered bill. This little bird was sparingly dispersed in pairs throughout the summer, over the honeysuckle and sheyoak scrub, where they bred, and in the autumn they congregated previous to leaving. The beak of all these birds is thick, of a reddish colour, having the appearance of being moulded in wax, whence their name. JNone of them had any song, ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1861 Excerpt: ... I generally found in low scrub, on the edges of the tea-tree. We come now to the finches, and the members of this class are smal...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:68 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.14 inPublished:February 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217451705

ISBN - 13:9780217451703

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