But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction by George RableBut There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction by George Rable

But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of Reconstruction

byGeorge Rable

Paperback | October 1, 2007

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This is a comprehensive examination of the use of violence by conservative southerners in the post-Civil War South to subvert Federal Reconstruction policies, overthrow Republican state governments, restore Democratic power, and reestablish white racial hegemony. Historians have often stressed the limited and even conservative nature of Federal policy in the Reconstruction South. However, George C. Rable argues, white southerners saw the intent and the results of that policy as revolutionary. Violence therefore became a counterrevolutionary instrument, placing the South in a pattern familiar to students of world revolution.
George C. Rable is Professor and Charles G. Summersell Chair in Southern History at the University of Alabama. His books include Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg! and The Confederate Republic.
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Title:But There Was No Peace: The Role of Violence in the Politics of ReconstructionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:272 pages, 9.24 × 6.21 × 0.55 inPublished:October 1, 2007Publisher:University Of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820330116

ISBN - 13:9780820330112

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Editorial Reviews

Brings to us the simple and terrible reminder that there was no peace for blacks and their white supporters in Dixie . . . A well-written monograph that clarifies both the successes and failures of Reconstruction.

- Journal of Southern History