By Herself by Debora GregerBy Herself by Debora Greger

By Herself

byDebora Greger

Paperback | September 25, 2012

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An artful, compelling new collection from “a special poet in every sense” (Poetry)

The poems in Debora Greger’s new book journey from Florida to England to Venice, finding in the byways and accidents of travel the ghostly presences that mark the poet’s passage from youth half-forgotten to the edge of old age: the younger self that, like some heroine in Henry James, she catches glimpses of and barely recognizes; the long-dead poets unable to sleep, with things still on their mind. The elegies threaded through this mature, startling book recognize life moving toward the shadows—these are poems of old responsibilities and new virtues, looking back as a way of looking forward.

About The Author

Debora Greger is a poet and professor who has won grants and awards from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Guggenheim foundation. Her work has appeared in American Poetry Review, The New Yorker, and Paris Review.
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Details & Specs

Title:By HerselfFormat:PaperbackDimensions:112 pages, 8.4 × 5.5 × 0.3 inPublished:September 25, 2012Publisher:Penguin Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0143122398

ISBN - 13:9780143122395

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Praise for Debora Greger:

“An exemplary Greger poem occurs to the ear as a striking painting does to the eye: the particulars of its composition emerge only after the first thrill of the whole.” —The Harvard Review