Cadaverland: Inventing A Pathology Of Catastrophe For Holocaust Survival [the Limits Of Medical Knowledge And Hi by Michael DorlandCadaverland: Inventing A Pathology Of Catastrophe For Holocaust Survival [the Limits Of Medical Knowledge And Hi by Michael Dorland

Cadaverland: Inventing A Pathology Of Catastrophe For Holocaust Survival [the Limits Of Medical…

byMichael Dorland

Hardcover | October 13, 2009

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In this extraordinary study, Michael Dorland explores sixty years of medical attempts by French doctors (mainly in the fields of neuropsychiatry and psychoanalysis) to describe the effects of concentration camp incarceration on Holocaust survivors. Dorland begins with a discussion of the liberation of concentration camp survivors, their stay in deportation camps, and eventual return to France, analyzing the circulation of mainly medical (neuropsychiatric) knowledge, its struggles to establish a symptomology of camp effects, and its broadening out into connected medical fields such as psychoanalysis. He then turns specifically to the French medical doctors who studied Holocaust survivors, and he investigates somatic, psychological, and holistic conceptions of survivors as patients and human beings. The final third of the book offers a comparative look at the "psy-science" approach to Holocaust survival beyond France, particularly in the United States and Israel. He illuminates the peculiar journey of a medical discourse that began in France but took on new forms elsewhere, eventually expanding into nonmedical fields to create the basis of the "traumato-culture" with which we are familiar today. Embedding his analysis of different medical discourses in the sociopolitical history of France in the twentieth century, he also looks at the French Jewish Question as it affected French medicine, the effects of five years of Nazi Occupation, France's enthusiastic collaboration, and the problems this would pose for postwar collective memory.
MICHAEL DORLAND is a professor in the School of Communication, Carleton University, Ottawa.
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Title:Cadaverland: Inventing A Pathology Of Catastrophe For Holocaust Survival [the Limits Of Medical…Format:HardcoverDimensions:300 pages, 9.29 × 6.29 × 1.04 inPublished:October 13, 2009Publisher:Brandeis University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1584657847

ISBN - 13:9781584657842

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments . Abbreviations . Introduction . my french "jewish question" . Writing History/Inventing History? . A Still Warm Corpse . Stu¨cke/Figu¨ren/Rhetoric . The Limits of Knowledge and Memory . the real . Who Knew What and When Did They Know It? . The French Resistance and the "Jewish Question" . Military Planning for the Liberation of the Camps and Prisoner Repatriation . The Liberation of the Western Camps . Medical Liberation . Allied DP Policies . The Nazi A-Bomb: The Continuing Jewish Problem . condensation . The Return . The Lutetia Hotel . War Crimes Forensics, 1945-1947 . From Testimony to Medical Discourse, 1945-1948 . The Psychology of Captivity, 1945-1946 . Medical Dissertations on Concentration Camps and Deportee Pathology, 1941-1946 . A Medical Field in Search of Itself, 1945-1953 . displacement . The Pathology of Catastrophe . The Somatologists, 1945-1948 . The "Halakhists," 1936-1948 . International Congresses on the Pathology of Deportation and Related Issues, 1946-1952 . The FIR Medical and Scientific Congresses, 1954-1981 . Minkowski: Psychopathology in Psychiatry and Holocaust Research, 1952-1982 . The Scandinavian School of KZ Syndrome, 1952-1980 . Polish Perspectives on KZ Syndrome, 1945-1961 . The Israeli Holocaust Problem and Early Research, 1948-1969 . inversion . The Failure of "Liberation Psychiatry," 1944-1947 . The Impossible Profession: Aspects of French Psychoanalytic History, 1926-1980 . Niederland, Krystal, and the Transformation of Concentration Camp Syndrome, 1963-1988 . Vicissitudes of the Figure of the Survivor, 1976-2005 . dilemma . Trauma and Traumato-Culture, 1945-1990 . Memory, Remembering, Commemoration, and Witnessing, 1949-2004 . Writing and Rewriting the Holocaust, 1945-? . conclusion: prosthesis . Notes . Bibliography . Index

Editorial Reviews

In this extraordinary study, Michael Dorland explores sixty years of medical attempts by French doctors (mainly in the fields of neuropsychiatry and psychoanalysis) to describe the effects of concentration camp incarceration on Holocaust survivors. Dorland begins with a discussion of the liberation of concentration camp survivors, their stay in deportation camps, and eventual return to France, analyzing the circulation of mainly medical (neuropsychiatric) knowledge, its struggles to establish a symptomology of camp effects, and its broadening out into connected medical fields such as psychoanalysis. He then turns specifically to the French medical doctors who studied Holocaust survivors, and he investigates somatic, psychological, and holistic conceptions of survivors as patients and human beings.The final third of the book offers a comparative look at the “psy-science” approach to Holocaust survival beyond France, particularly in the United States and Israel. He illuminates the peculiar journey of a medical discourse that began in France but took on new forms elsewhere, eventually expanding into nonmedical fields to create the basis of the “traumato-culture” with which we are familiar today.Embedding his analysis of different medical discourses in the sociopolitical history of France in the twentieth century, he also looks at the French Jewish Question as it affected French medicine, the effects of five years of Nazi Occupation, France’s enthusiastic collaboration, and the problems this would pose for postwar collective memory.“Michael Dorland’s Cadaverland is the most important historical study dealing with the medical ramifications of the Holocaust. Focusing on the psychiatric and psychological literature dealing with the impact of the Shoah for the survivors and for their families, Dorland sketches the difficult, contradictory, often self-destructive struggle of psychological medicine with the horrors of the Shoah. Brilliantly written and ranging well beyond the confines of post-war France, this is a book that health care practitioners as well as all those dealing with trauma and its historical aftermath MUST read.” - Sander L. Gilman, Director, Program in Psychoanalysis, Emory University