Caffaro, Genoa and the Twelfth-Century Crusades

by Mr Martin Hall, Professor Jonathan Phillips

Ashgate Publishing Ltd | October 28, 2013 | Kobo Edition (eBook)

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This volume is the first comprehensive English translation, with a substantial introduction and notes, of the writings of Caffaro of Genoa, as well as related texts and documents on Genoa and the crusades. The majority of early crusading historiography is from a northern European and clerical perspective and Caffaro’s voice offers an exciting departure with his more secular and Mediterranean tone. This book adds to our understanding of the reception of crusading ideas in the Mediterranean and, given Genoa’s prominence in the commercial world, illuminates the complex and controversial relationship between holy war and financial gain.

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 28, 2013

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Ltd

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1472401425

ISBN - 13: 9781472401427

Found in: History

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Kobo eBookCaffaro, Genoa and the Twelfth-Century Crusades

Caffaro, Genoa and the Twelfth-Century Crusades

by Mr Martin Hall, Professor Jonathan Phillips

Format: Kobo Edition (eBook)

Published: October 28, 2013

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Ltd

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 1472401425

ISBN - 13: 9781472401427

From the Publisher

This volume is the first comprehensive English translation, with a substantial introduction and notes, of the writings of Caffaro of Genoa, as well as related texts and documents on Genoa and the crusades. The majority of early crusading historiography is from a northern European and clerical perspective and Caffaro’s voice offers an exciting departure with his more secular and Mediterranean tone. This book adds to our understanding of the reception of crusading ideas in the Mediterranean and, given Genoa’s prominence in the commercial world, illuminates the complex and controversial relationship between holy war and financial gain.