Calvet's Web: Enlightenment and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century France by L. W. B. BrocklissCalvet's Web: Enlightenment and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century France by L. W. B. Brockliss

Calvet's Web: Enlightenment and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century France

byL. W. B. Brockliss

Hardcover | July 15, 2002

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Calvet's Web is a study of the correspondence network of an Avignon physician in the period 1750-1810. Esprit Calvet was an antiquarian, natural historian, and bibliophile, and was at the centre of a circle of like-minded intellectuals from various backgrounds, chiefly based in the Rhonevalley. Laurence Brockliss explores for the first time in detail the intellectual interests and relationships of a representative sample of the French Republic of Letters. He traces the destruction of the Republic during the Revolution, and its reconstruction, in different guise, under Napoleon.Calvet's Web is an important contribution to our understanding of the social construction of knowledge, the history of collecting, and the history of the book. In addition, by examining the circle's attitude to the philosophes and their programme of material and moral progress, it offers a newpicture of the relationship between the Republic of Letters and the Enlightenment.
Laurence Brockliss is a Reader in Modern History, Magdalen College, Oxford.
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Title:Calvet's Web: Enlightenment and the Republic of Letters in Eighteenth-Century FranceFormat:HardcoverDimensions:506 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.26 inPublished:July 15, 2002Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019924748X

ISBN - 13:9780199247486

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Republic of Letters and Enlightenment1. Esprit Calvet2. The intellectual milieu3. The physician4. The antiquarian5. The natural historian6. The bibliophile7. The revolutionary climacteric8. Conclusion: Enlightenment and Republic of Letters

Editorial Reviews

`...a valuable model of how biography can double as a carefully contextualized study of life in the eighteenth-century world of learning.'Eighteenth-Century Studies