Can't Quit You, Baby

Paperback | December 1, 1989

byEllen Douglas

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Rich, white Cornelia and poor, black Tweet share a Mississippi kitchen for 15 years, rolling out pie crusts, peeling figs, making conversation. As the years go by, each reveals her own crises, and in her moment of deepest need, each is rescued by the other

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Rich, white Cornelia and poor, black Tweet share a Mississippi kitchen for 15 years, rolling out pie crusts, peeling figs, making conversation. As the years go by, each reveals her own crises, and in her moment of deepest need, each is rescued by the other

Ellen Douglas, whose real name is Josephine Haxton, was born in Natchez, Mississippi, and published her first novel, A Family's Affairs, in 1962. This first endeavor, as well as her short-story collection Black Cloud, White Cloud were both included in The New York Times Book Review's year's ten best listings. Her fourth novel, Apostles...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 7.8 × 5.1 × 0.7 inPublished:December 1, 1989Publisher:Penguin Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0140121021

ISBN - 13:9780140121025

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Rich, white Cornelia and poor, black Tweet share a Mississippi kitchen for 15 years, rolling out pie crusts, peeling figs, making conversation. As the years go by, each reveals her own crises, and in her moment of deepest need, each is rescued by the other