Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation by David V. Skinner

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

byDavid V. Skinner, Richard Vincent

Paperback | April 30, 1999

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This book describes all aspects of the management of cardiopulmonary arrest in both adults and children. The management of life-threatening cardiac emergencies, including myocardial infarction and various arrhythmias is also described in detail. This book will be useful to all those doctors,nurses, and paramedics working in the front line of medicine who are expected to respond promptly and effectively to such emergencies.

About The Author

David V. Skinner is at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. Richard I. Vincent is at The Royal Sussex County Hospital.
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Details & Specs

Title:Cardiopulmonary ResuscitationFormat:PaperbackDimensions:232 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.55 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0192626930

ISBN - 13:9780192626936

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Table of Contents

PrefaceIntroduction to cardiopulmonary resuscitation1. Management of cardiac arrest2. Cardiac arrest associated with special circumstances3. Resuscitation in hospital4. Management of acute myocardial infarction5. Ventilation and intravenous cannulation6. Management of common arrhythmias associated with cardiac arrest7. Biochemistry and pharmacology of cardiac arrest8. Paediatric resuscitation9. Who to resuscitate and post-resuscitation careUseful addressesIndex

Editorial Reviews

'The text is clear and concise ... Armed with Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, one would have little excuse for not being able to run a calm and well-organised cardiac arrest. I am sure that it will be a valuable addition to the shelves of any training resuscitation officer, but it may not winthe battle for space in the already bulging pockets of the junior doctor's white coat.'L.A. Mitchell, Royal Surrey County Hospital, The Lancet, Vol 341, June 1993