Carl Maxey: A Fighting Life

Hardcover | August 14, 2015

byJim Kershner

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Carl Maxey was, in his own words, ?a guy who started from scratch - black scratch.? He was sent, at age five, to the scandal-ridden Spokane Children's Home and then kicked out at age eleven with the only other ?colored? orphan. Yet Maxey managed to make a national name for himself, first as an NCAA championship boxer at Gonzaga University, and then as eastern Washington's first prominent black lawyer and a renowned civil rights attorney who always fought for the underdog.

During the tumultuous civil rights and Vietnam War eras, Carl Maxey fought to break down color barriers in his hometown of Spokane and throughout the nation. As a defense lawyer, he made national headlines working on lurid murder cases and war-protest trials, including the notorious Seattle Seven trial. He even took his commitment to justice and antiwar causes to the political arena, running for the U.S. Senate against powerhouse senator Henry M. Jackson.

In Carl Maxey: A Fighting Life, Jim Kershner explores the sources of Maxey's passions as well as the price he ultimately paid for his struggles. The result is a moving portrait of a man called a ?Type-A Gandhi? by the New York Times, whose own personal misfortune spurred his lifelong, tireless crusade against injustice.

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Carl Maxey was, in his own words, ?a guy who started from scratch - black scratch.? He was sent, at age five, to the scandal-ridden Spokane Children's Home and then kicked out at age eleven with the only other ?colored? orphan. Yet Maxey managed to make a national name for himself, first as an NCAA championship boxer at Gonzaga Univers...

Jim Kershner is a journalist for The Spokesman-Review in Spokane.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:August 14, 2015Publisher:UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON PRESSLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295997346

ISBN - 13:9780295997346

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Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgments1. An Orphan's Fire2. A Father in Black Robes3. The Count and the Club4. Walking Right into Trouble5. King Carl Wins the Crown6. Eastern Washington's First Black Lawyer7. Stirrings from the South8. The Haircut Uproar and a Perfunctory Execution9. Freedom Summer in the Tail End of America10. "The Sickness of Our Nation"11. A Right Hook to Scoop Jackson12. The Seattle Seven Circus13. The Maxey Temper14. Ruth Coe's Greek Tragedy15. "No Goddamned Award"16. "Living through All This B.S."17. Type-A GandhiNotes on SourcesIndex

Editorial Reviews

Carl Maxey was, in his own words, ?a guy who started from scratch - black scratch.? He was sent, at age five, to the scandal-ridden Spokane Children's Home and then kicked out at age eleven with the only other ?colored? orphan. Yet Maxey managed to make a national name for himself, first as an NCAA championship boxer at Gonzaga University, and then as eastern Washington's first prominent black lawyer and a renowned civil rights attorney who always fought for the underdog.During the tumultuous civil rights and Vietnam War eras, Carl Maxey fought to break down color barriers in his hometown of Spokane and throughout the nation. As a defense lawyer, he made national headlines working on lurid murder cases and war-protest trials, including the notorious Seattle Seven trial. He even took his commitment to justice and antiwar causes to the political arena, running for the U.S. Senate against powerhouse senator Henry M. Jackson.In Carl Maxey: A Fighting Life, Jim Kershner explores the sources of Maxey's passions as well as the price he ultimately paid for his struggles. The result is a moving portrait of a man called a ?Type-A Gandhi? by the New York Times, whose own personal misfortune spurred his lifelong, tireless crusade against injustice.Jim Kershner's biography of activist Carl Maxey is not only inspirational and informative, but because it is so well written it is also a pleasure to read. - Carlos Schwantes, University of Missouri?St. Louis