Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1660-1745 by Raymond D. TumblesonCatholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1660-1745 by Raymond D. Tumbleson

Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1660-1745

byRaymond D. Tumbleson

Paperback | February 5, 2009

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This study examines the role of anti-Catholic rhetoric in late-seventeenth- and early-eighteenth-century England. Raymond Tumbleson shows how the fear of Popery, a potentially destabilizing force under the Stuarts, ultimately became a principal guarantor of the Hanoverian oligarchy. Discussing writers from Middleton, Milton and Marvell to Swift, Defoe and Fielding, as well as numerous pamphleteers, the book crosses traditional generic, disciplinary and chronological boundaries between poetry and prose, literature and polemic, the Reformation and the Augustan age.
Title:Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1660-1745Format:PaperbackDimensions:268 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.59 inPublished:February 5, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521100895

ISBN - 13:9780521100892

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Constructing the nation, constructing the other: martyrology and mercantilism; 2. Of true religion and false politics: Milton, Marvell and Popery; 3. 'The King's Spiritual Militia': the Church of England and the plot of the plot; 4. 'Reason and Religion': the science of Anglicanism; 5. Polemic and silence: Jeremy Collier, Elkanah Settle, and the ideological appropriation of morality; 6. 'Politeness and politics': the literature of exclusion and the 'true Protestant heart'; Conclusion.

Editorial Reviews

"...Tumbleson deserves praise for examining lesser-known and long-ignored works of such canonical authors as Milton and Andrew Marvell, revealing aspects of the two writers that have been obscured by a post-Enlightenment literary and political culture determined to obscure its sectarian origins...Tubleson's work helps significantly in illuminating many otherwise puzzling theological issues in seventeenth-century England." Isis