Catholicism in the Second Spanish Republic: Religion and Politics in Salamanca 1930-1936 by Mary VincentCatholicism in the Second Spanish Republic: Religion and Politics in Salamanca 1930-1936 by Mary Vincent

Catholicism in the Second Spanish Republic: Religion and Politics in Salamanca 1930-1936

byMary Vincent

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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The Second Spanish Republic survived unchallenged for a mere five years, its fall plunging Spain into a bitter civil war. The brief political history of the republic was characterized by the rapid polarization of right and left - a process in which religion played a crucial role. Many of theordinary faithful came to feel excluded from the new Republic, whilst those who aspired to lead them insisted that to be Catholic was to be anti-Republican.Mary Vincent examines this crucial period in Spanish history, focusing on Salamaca, the home province of the leader of the principal confessional party. Jose Maria Gil Robles, and the place where the right mobilized earlier than anywhere else in Spain. The author demonstrates how political choicewas eroded under the Second Republic, and reveals how popular religiosity came to be the right's most potent weapon.This original and important new analysis throws new light on the origins of the Spanish Civil War and on the controversies over who bore ultimate responsibility for the conflict.
Mary Vincent is a Lecturer in Modern European History at University of Sheffield.
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Title:Catholicism in the Second Spanish Republic: Religion and Politics in Salamanca 1930-1936Format:HardcoverDimensions:300 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.87 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198206135

ISBN - 13:9780198206132

Reviews

From Our Editors

The Second Spanish Republic survived unchallenged for a mere five years, its fall plunging Spain into a bitter civil war. The brief political history of the Republic was characterized by the rapid polarization of right and left - a process in which religion played a crucial role. Many of the ordinary faithful came to feel excluded from the new Republic, whilst those who aspired to lead them insisted that to be Catholic was to be anti-republican. Mary Vincent examines this crucial period in Spanish history, focusing on Salamanca, the home province of the leader of the principal confessional party, Jose Maria Gil Robles, and the place where the right mobilized earlier than anywhere else in Spain. The author demonstrates how political choice was eroded under the Second Republic, and reveals how popular religiosity came to be the right's most potent weapon. This original and important new analysis throws new light on the origins of the Spanish Civil War and on the controversies over who bore ultimate responsibility for the conflict.

Editorial Reviews

`Building her fascinating account from patchy and unpromising source material, Dr Vincent successfully evokes and fairly explains the Salmantine version of the traditional Catholic world-view and ... valuably details the work of the orders and laity in providing schooling and social assistancewhen there were minimal secular facilities ... well-written work enriched by vivid quotations.'R.A.H. Robinson, University of Birmingham, History, Vol. 83, No. 269