Centaur

Paperback | May 17, 2013

byGreg Wrenn

not yet rated|write a review
Greg Wrenn's debut collection opens with a long poem in which a man undergoes surgery to become a centaur. Other poems speak in voices as varied as those of Robert Mapplethorpe, Hercules, and a Wise Man at the birth of Jesus. Centaur skitters along the blurred lines between compulsivity and following one's heart, stasis and self-realization, human and animal. Here, suffering and transcendence are restlessly conjoined.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$22.50

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

Greg Wrenn's debut collection opens with a long poem in which a man undergoes surgery to become a centaur. Other poems speak in voices as varied as those of Robert Mapplethorpe, Hercules, and a Wise Man at the birth of Jesus. Centaur skitters along the blurred lines between compulsivity and following one's heart, stasis and self-realiz...

Greg Wrenn, a native of northeast Florida, is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow and a recipient of the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America. His work has appeared in New England Review, The American Poetry Review, The Yale Review, and elsewhere. He is a Jones Lecturer at Stanford University.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:92 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.4 inPublished:May 17, 2013Publisher:University Of Wisconsin PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0299294447

ISBN - 13:9780299294441

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Centaur

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
 
I.
Centaur
 
II.
Low Tide on the Windward Shore
Promiscuity
One of the Magi
Renunciation
Brother on Brother
Reuben on Joseph
Pontiff
Self-Portrait as Robert Mapplethorpe
Manger
Circumcision
 
III.
Virus
 
IV.
Thirteen Labors
 
V.
Ascent
Camphor
Prayer at Ojai
Mother of Light
Revision
South of Jacksonville
Three Attempts to Understand Suffering
Onto
 
Notes

Editorial Reviews

“Greg Wrenn’s poems are quietly allusive and deep; his completely original style . . . perhaps shows the direction our poetry is headed during this new era of the written word’s ascendancy.”—The Antioch Review