Chain Saw Confidential: How We Made the World's Most Notorious Horror Movie by Gunnar HansenChain Saw Confidential: How We Made the World's Most Notorious Horror Movie by Gunnar Hansen

Chain Saw Confidential: How We Made the World's Most Notorious Horror Movie

byGunnar Hansen

Paperback | September 23, 2014

not yet rated|write a review

Pricing and Purchase Info

$20.25 online 
$22.50 list price save 10%
Earn 101 plum® points

Ships within 1-2 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Available in stores

about

The original 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre seized the imaginations of audiences and critics alike. A controversial cult sensation recognized by Total Film as the greatest horror movie ever made, it's been shown at Cannes, briefly banned in England, and included in the permanent collection of New York's MoMA. This fascinating literary memoir of the making of the film comes from the utterly unique perspective of Gunnar Hansen, the actor who played the chain saw-wielding Leatherface. A critically acclaimed poet and author, Hansen tells the real story of the film, debunking myths, giving behind-the-scenes details, and offering insights on the film's reception and our enduring fascination with the horror genre today.

About The Author

Gunnar Hansen is the author of several books of history, travel, and poetry. He lives on the coast of Maine.

Details & Specs

Title:Chain Saw Confidential: How We Made the World's Most Notorious Horror MovieFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 9 × 5.88 × 0.63 inPublished:September 23, 2014Publisher:Chronicle BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1452140049

ISBN - 13:9781452140049

Look for similar items by category:

Nearby Stores

We found 0 nearby stores

Customer Reviews of Chain Saw Confidential: How We Made the World's Most Notorious Horror Movie

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Detailed The title says it all. The author, Gunnar, who played 'Leatherface' discusses what it was like filming this over the course of eight weeks in the awful Texas heat in 1973 and getting screwed out of their money. He originally only got $800 for the role. Most interesting to me was that the story was 'rooted' in Hansel and Gretel (who doesn't love that story?) and that Leatherface's mask and home 'furnishings' were inspired by American murderer Ed Gein, which I already knew, having seen shows on Ed and having read a book about him years ago. FYI- Ed also made leggings and a 'mammary vest' from real humans. He killed two women and robbed graves to get other body parts. It would have been real cool for Leatherface to have worn a vest like that. Gunnar said that during filming of the final scene when Sally (Marilyn Burns) gets away, he was stepping up into the back of the truck, his foot got caught and the truck driver pulled off, dragging Gunnar. That was a true accident so they refilmed it but I think they should have left that in. Maybe have Sally try to untangle his foot or something. But this was low budget and there wasn't time or money for that. Gunnar mistakenly said that Ed robbed his own mother's grave (page 92) and put the bones back in her bed. Wrong. He did no such thing. He loved his mother and closed her room off. It was the only clean place in the house. Some interesting tidbits are: that the opening scene was to be of a dead dog's eye, which they filmed, but they decided against using a domesticated animal. They decided against using a dead horse too. Most of the bones in the film were found in pastures. Some of the dialogue was improvised. Paul, the awful actor who played wheelchair-bound Franklin (I can't stand his character!), wasn't as horrible in real life as he'd lead everyone to believe. During the course of filming none of the actors were allowed to wash their clothes, ever, for fear of colors fading or something else happening to them at the cleaners, since no one had a duplicate set. Though the book is fairly short I got a bit bored with the day to day goings on at the shoot. There are 16 pages of black and white photos from the set in the book, which is nice. I received this from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
Date published: 2013-12-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Detailed The title says it all. The author, Gunnar, who played 'Leatherface' discusses what it was like filming this over the course of eight weeks in the awful Texas heat in 1973 and getting screwed out of their money. He originally only got $800 for the role. Most interesting to me was that the story was 'rooted' in Hansel and Gretel (who doesn't love that story?) and that Leatherface's mask and home 'furnishings' were inspired by American murderer Ed Gein, which I already knew, having seen shows on Ed and having read a book about him years ago. FYI- Ed also made leggings and a 'mammary vest' from real humans. He killed two women and robbed graves to get other body parts. It would have been real cool for Leatherface to have worn a vest like that. Gunnar said that during filming of the final scene when Sally (Marilyn Burns) gets away, he was stepping up into the back of the truck, his foot got caught and the truck driver pulled off, dragging Gunnar. That was a true accident so they refilmed it but I think they should have left that in. Maybe have Sally try to untangle his foot or something. But this was low budget and there wasn't time or money for that. Gunnar mistakenly said that Ed robbed his own mother's grave (page 92) and put the bones back in her bed. Wrong. He did no such thing. He loved his mother and closed her room off. It was the only clean place in the house. Some interesting tidbits are: that the opening scene was to be of a dead dog's eye, which they filmed, but they decided against using a domesticated animal. They decided against using a dead horse too. Most of the bones in the film were found in pastures. Some of the dialogue was improvised. Paul, the awful actor who played wheelchair-bound Franklin (I can't stand his character!), wasn't as horrible in real life as he'd lead everyone to believe. During the course of filming none of the actors were allowed to wash their clothes, ever, for fear of colors fading or something else happening to them at the cleaners, since no one had a duplicate set. Though the book is fairly short I got a bit bored with the day to day goings on at the shoot. There are 16 pages of black and white photos from the set in the book, which is nice. I received this from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
Date published: 2013-12-17