Changing Places: History, Community, And Identity In Northeastern Ontario by Kerry M. AbelChanging Places: History, Community, And Identity In Northeastern Ontario by Kerry M. Abel

Changing Places: History, Community, And Identity In Northeastern Ontario

byKerry M. Abel

Paperback | May 5, 2006

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The community of Aboriginal groups and fur trade society that had initially developed at Porcupine-Iroquois Falls (c. 1660-1905) was displaced early in the twentieth century by newcomers drawn to the opportunities offered by mining, agriculture, and pulp and paper production. The newcomers came from many different cultural backgrounds, which led to divisions in the towns and villages they created. By the mid twentieth century, however, a community identity had been built on shared experience, hostility towards the "South" and certain ethnic groups, and an imagined sense of northern uniqueness. Changing Places rejects traditional sociological and anthropological models about community and identity in favour of a more nuanced interpretation that takes historical process into account. Drawing from archival, oral, and newspaper sources, Kerry Abel examines the process by which a relatively coherent community emerged in the sub-region of Northern Ontario bounded by Timmins, Iroquois Falls, and Matheson and provides the only comprehensive history of this area.
Kerry M. Abel is an independent scholar and the author of Drum Songs: Glimpses of Dene History.
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Title:Changing Places: History, Community, And Identity In Northeastern OntarioFormat:PaperbackDimensions:544 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.55 inPublished:May 5, 2006Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773530711

ISBN - 13:9780773530713

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Editorial Reviews

"A brilliant integration of theory and historical fact, neatly steering between local historical trivia that is characteristic of many regional works and social scientific abstraction." Matt Bray, history, Laurentian University