Chats; "now Talked Of This And Then Of That"

Paperback | February 5, 2012

byGeorgianna Hamlen

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884. Excerpt: ... trying to hide his dulness, and that is dishonest. It's silly, too," he adds; "anybody has a right to be dull," and then he looks defiant, as he always does when he has uttered a paradox. What do you say to that, young ladies who echo? PIRATES. Left, right! left, right! through the hall. Bang, bangj on Our Tender's sitting-room door, and enter Master Johnny, aged ten, and Master Johnny's bosom friends, terrible to behold in paper hats of ferocious brim; red sashes that have a suspicious resemblance to the girls' nubias, and broomsticks cut down to the proper length for doing duty as swords. Our Tender gazes with a rapt and dazzled stare at this martial array, and waits for an explanation. "We are pirates," says Johnny, with solemnity. "We are pirates," growl his two friends, shaking their sash ends, touching their swords, and cocking their hats more fiercely. "Ah, and what cowardly thing are you going to do now?" "We do no cowardly things," replies the chief of the marauding band. "We--we kill folks." "Unarmed women, for instance?" asks Our Tender. "We take our victims wherever we find them," declares Pirate Number Two. "We burn, slaughter, or drown them, as fancy wills." "Very good, and very brave when you are three to one. It is quite like pirates, though, and I congratulate you on assuming the part so well. Still it seems cowardly to me, and so very cowardly that I object to your playing at being pirates, unless in a game in which you are well beaten by honest men." Johnny's eyes grew round, and his playmates looked astonished, but being invited to give their impressions as to what a pirate really was, stated in substance that he was a manly creature, six feet tall, who killed a hundred men, more or less, every year, never showed pity for any human cre...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884. Excerpt: ... trying to hide his dulness, and that is dishonest. It's silly, too," he adds; "anybody has a right to be dull," and then he lo...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:58 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.12 inPublished:February 5, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217343619

ISBN - 13:9780217343619

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