Chemical Field Lectures; A Familiar Exposition Of The Chemistry Of Agriculture, Addresses To Farmers

Paperback | January 17, 2012

byJulius Adolph Stöckhardt

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This historic book may have numerous typos or missing text. Not indexed. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1853. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... greater pecuniary advantage, by a judicious succession of crops, and likewise especially by the application of very powerful manures (guano, bone-dust, etc.), although these, abstractedly considered, can furnish little humus. When by these a more vigorous growth of plants is effected, the roots and leaves become larger, and the soil acquires, therefore, by the fall of the latter and the decay of the former, more material for the formation of humus than by less vigorous forcing and a poorer vegetable growth; perhaps more than it would have acquired by manuring with straw-manure. 3. Plants receive nitrogen chiefly through the ammonia which is generated during the putrefaction and decay of vegetable, and, more particularly, of animal substances. Plants are always surrounded by air, and the air consists mainly of nitrogen. Hence it might be concluded that they could never lack the means of obtaining this element when it is necessary to the structure of their tissue, inasmuch as they have the opportunity of absorbing it in any quantity from the atmosphere. And yet they are without it in many, perhaps the greater number of fields; and it is for this reason that these do not produce so many or such vigorous plants as they in general might; a fact which will be more precisely shown in the following chapter. From the circumstance,, therefore, that plants do not take up the nitrogen of the air as nourishment, we must infer their inability to do so, and come to the conclusion, that pure nitrogen is to them no digestible and befitting food. And thus it is in fact. The chemist undertakes to explain this indigestibility of nitrogen, from its natural constitution. One of the distinctive chemical properties of this gas is its disinclination to combine with other bodies; i...

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This historic book may have numerous typos or missing text. Not indexed. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1853. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... greater pecuniary advantage, by a judicious succession of crops, and likewise especially by the application of very powerful ma...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:58 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.12 inPublished:January 17, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217810187

ISBN - 13:9780217810180

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